rainforest rainforest

A white-throated round-eared bat (Tonatia silvicola) catches — and munches — a katydid on Barro Colorado Island in Panama. Katydids are "the potato chips of the rain forest," scientists say. Christian Ziegler/ Minden Pictures/Getty Images hide caption

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Christian Ziegler/ Minden Pictures/Getty Images

Sound Matters: Sex And Death In The Rain Forest

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An adult spirit bear crosses a fallen log over a stream in the Great Bear Rainforest in British Columbia. Barcroft Media/Barcroft Media via Getty Images hide caption

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Barcroft Media/Barcroft Media via Getty Images

This is one of 12 rain forest landscapes by Abel Rodriguez, part of his ink-and-watercolor series Ciclo anual del bosque de la vega (Seasonal changes in the flooded rain forest). Abel Rodriguez/Courtesy of Tropenbos International, Colombia hide caption

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Abel Rodriguez/Courtesy of Tropenbos International, Colombia