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atomic bomb

Jack ReVelle and his daughter, Karen, at StoryCorps in Santa Ana, Calif., last month. ReVelle recovered two hydrogen bombs that had accidentally dropped from a U.S. military aircraft in 1961. Many details about what happened were not released until they were declassified in 2013. Kevin Oliver/StoryCorps hide caption

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Kevin Oliver/StoryCorps

8 Days, 2 H-Bombs, And 1 Team That Stopped A Catastrophe

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World War II Norwegian resistance fighter Joachim Roenneberg, seen here in 2013, has died at age 99. He led a team that was credited with slowing Hitler's plan to build atomic weapons. Andrew Winning/Reuters hide caption

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Andrew Winning/Reuters

Neil deGrasse Tyson attends Film Independent at LACMA presents StarTalk — A Conversation with Astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson, on June 5 in Los Angeles. Araya Diaz/Getty Images hide caption

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Araya Diaz/Getty Images

In 1952, atomic scientists came together on the 10th anniversary of the first controlled nuclear fission chain reaction, which took place Dec. 2, 1942, at the University of Chicago. Courtesy of University of Chicago Photographic Archive hide caption

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Courtesy of University of Chicago Photographic Archive

An archival view of Oak Ridge, Tenn. shows one of the three sites that has been included in the Manhattan Project National Historical Park. United States Department of Energy/Flickr hide caption

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United States Department of Energy/Flickr

Passions Flare Over Memory Of The Manhattan Project

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President Obama bows as he greets Japanese Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko at the Imperial Palace in Tokyo in 2009. The president travels to Japan next month and there's speculation he might visit Hiroshima, the site of the world's first atomic bombing. Charles Dharapak/AP hide caption

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Charles Dharapak/AP

Sumiteru Taniguchi, 86, a survivor of the 1945 atomic bombing of Nagasaki, walks up to deliver his speech at the 70th anniversary of the atomic bombing in Nagasaki, southern Japan, on Sunday. Eugene Hoshiko/AP hide caption

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Eugene Hoshiko/AP

A man pushes a loaded bicycle down a cleared path in a flattened area of Nagasaki more than a month after the nuclear attack in 1945. Stanley Troutman/AP hide caption

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Stanley Troutman/AP

Remembering The Horror Of Nagasaki 70 Years Later

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Children offer prayers Thursday after releasing paper lanterns to the Motoyasu River, where tens of thousands of atomic bombing victims died, with the backdrop of the Atomic Bomb Dome in Hiroshima. Eugene Hoshiko/AP hide caption

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Eugene Hoshiko/AP