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El Nino

Buried together, a child and a llama were part of a mass sacrificial killing that included more than 140 children and over 200 llamas in the Huanchaquito-Las Llamas site in coastal Peru near Trujillo. Gabriel Prieto/National Geographic hide caption

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Gabriel Prieto/National Geographic

Sea ice melts off the beach of Barrow, Alaska, where Operation IceBridge is based for its summer 2016 campaign. Kate Ramsayer/NASA hide caption

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Kate Ramsayer/NASA

As July's Record Heat Builds Through August, Arctic Ice Keeps Melting

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A heat-stressed koala is doused with water in December 2015 during an extreme heat wave in Adelaide, Australia. Last year was the hottest on record, but 2016 is on pace to supplant it at the top of the list. Every month of this year has set heat records. Morne de Klerk/Getty Images hide caption

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Morne de Klerk/Getty Images

Scientists Report The Planet Was Hotter Than Ever In The First Half Of 2016

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New York City called a travel ban on vehicles in Times Square and elsewhere during last weekend's storm, which broke snowfall records all along the Mid-Atlantic coast. Yana Paskova/Getty Images hide caption

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Yana Paskova/Getty Images

A Big El Niño Was The Likely Instigator Of Last Week's Blizzard

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Joseph Daniel Fiedler for NPR

El Niño Does Bring Floods And Drought, But There's A Silver Lining

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A photo from May shows Gino Celli checking his parched crops near his farm near Stockton, Calif. If predictions of a strong El Niño prove true, it could presage a relief from the region's prolonged drought. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP