border border
Stories About

border

Victor Santana mans a row of port-a-potties near the Bridge of the Americas separating Juárez from El Paso. Disruptions at the border have caused long wait times at the border. Ciudad Juárez is offering free bathrooms for travelers stuck in those long lines. Mallory Falk/KRWG hide caption

toggle caption
Mallory Falk/KRWG

Tension And Anxiety In Border Cities After Trump Threatens Closure

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/710577331/710712216" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Irsi Castillo of Honduras holds her 3-year-old daughter just after crossing the Rio Grande into the U.S. at El Paso, Texas. Castillo is one in the surge of thousands of migrants claiming asylum at the U.S.-Mexico border. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
John Burnett/NPR

With Thousands Of Migrants Crossing The Border Daily, We Asked 'Why Now?'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/705620835/708867707" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In 2017 the Trump Administration put up eight border wall prototypes to demonstrate the "next generation" of border barriers. On Wednesday, all but one were demolished. Max Rivlin-Nadler for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Max Rivlin-Nadler for NPR

A young man and a little girl look at the border fence from Playas de Tijuana, Mexico. Photojournalist Ariana Drehsler has been covering the caravan of migrants for weeks. In December, Customs and Border Protection agents began pulling her over for questioning each time she crossed back into the U.S. Ariana Drehsler for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Ariana Drehsler for NPR

Nearly 1,600 teenage migrants are housed at a temporary emergency shelter in Florida run by a for-profit company. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services hide caption

toggle caption
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Members of the U.S. military install multiple tiers of concertina wire along the banks of the Rio Grande near the Juarez-Lincoln Bridge at the U.S.-Mexico border in Laredo, Texas, in November. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Eric Gay/AP

Migrants run as tear gas is thrown by U.S. Customs and Border Protection agents to the Mexican side of the border fence after they climbed the fence to get to San Diego from Tijuana, Mexico. Daniel Ochoa de Olza/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Daniel Ochoa de Olza/AP

U.S. Agents Fire Tear Gas At Migrants Trying To Cross Mexico Border

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/681513362/681535295" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

People line up to cross into the United States from Tijuana, Mexico, seen through barriers topped with concertina wire at the San Ysidro Port of Entry in San Diego. A federal judge on Wednesday blocked the administration from enforcing a ban on asylum-seekers fleeing gang violence or domestic abuse. Gregory Bull/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Gregory Bull/AP

Families eat dinner at Holy Family Church in El Paso. Immigration officials have been releasing hundreds of asylum-seeking migrants into border communities. Churches and shelters are standing by to help. Mallory Falk/KRWG hide caption

toggle caption
Mallory Falk/KRWG

Along The Southwest Border, Shelters and Churches Scramble To House Migrant Families

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/663685207/664528993" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Members of the 89th Military Police and 541st Engineering Company, 19th Engineering Battalion at Fort Knox, Ky., are briefed upon arrival Wednesday at Lackland Air Force Base, Texas. They are among some 7,000 troops deploying to the U.S.-Mexican border. Senior Airman Alexandra Minor/Department of Defense hide caption

toggle caption
Senior Airman Alexandra Minor/Department of Defense

Thousands of migrants attempted to cross the border from Guatemala into Mexico this week. Many of the migrants have reportedly returned to their home countries of Honduras and Guatemala. Oliver de Ros/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Oliver de Ros/AP

Kenia Guerrero, 23, stands on the El Paso, Texas, side of the Paso del Norte International Bridge, also known as the Santa Fe Street Bridge — a port of entry into the U.S. from Mexico. Guerrero is from Juarez just across the border but says she feels just as at home in El Paso. Denise Tejada/Youth Radio hide caption

toggle caption
Denise Tejada/Youth Radio

Young People Adapt To A Changing Life At The Texas-Mexico Border

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/630076251/630921466" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

People demonstrate in Washington, D.C., on Thursday, demanding an end to the separation of migrant children from their parents. On Friday, the Justice Department said in a court filing that "the government will not separate families but detain families together during the pendency of immigration proceedings." Nicholas Kamm /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Nicholas Kamm /AFP/Getty Images

Democratic members of Congress protest the Trump family separate policy. From left to right: Reps. Joseph Crowley, Luis Gutierrez, Pramila Jayapal, John Lewis and Judy Chu. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Alex Wong/Getty Images

Hillary Clinton (from left), Michelle Obama, Melania Trump, Rosalynn Carter and Laura Bush all have expressed their concern about migrant children being torn from parents at the Mexico border. AP hide caption

toggle caption
AP

House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., and Speaker of the House Paul Ryan, R-Wis., confer during a news conference following a closed-door GOP meeting on immigration last week. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

toggle caption
J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Archbishop Thomas Wenski of Miami, photographed at a news conference in 2015, said the Trump administration's policy of separating immigrant children from their families "goes against the values of our nation." Sid Hastings/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Sid Hastings/AP

A member of a migrant caravan from Central America kisses a baby as they pray in preparation for an asylum request in the U.S., in Tijuana, Baja California state, Mexico. Edgard Garrido/REUTERS hide caption

toggle caption
Edgard Garrido/REUTERS

Central American asylum-seekers ride a bus to Tijuana on Wednesday, while passing through San Luis Rio Colorado along the U.S.-Mexico border. Hundreds of immigrants, the remnants of a caravan of Central Americans that began almost a month ago, set out on the last leg of their journey north in Mexico. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
John Moore/Getty Images

The Mexican ambassador to the United States, Gerónimo Gutiérrez, speaks at a news conference at the Mexican Embassy in Washington on March 9, 2017. Aaron Bernstein/Reuters hide caption

toggle caption
Aaron Bernstein/Reuters

Mexican Ambassador To U.S. Predicts Caravan Will 'Conclude' Within Days

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/599227558/599255555" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Raymond Skiles, longtime wildlife biologist at Big Bend National Park, says that animals require free access to the Rio Grande as their primary water source. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
John Burnett/NPR

In Big Bend, Texas, There's Bipartisan Consensus: No Border Wall

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/526612415/526779581" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript