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taste perception

The rich savory flavor of miso soup is one way to experience umami, the fifth major taste. Yuuji/Getty Images hide caption

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How umami overcame discrimination and took its place as the 5th taste

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Computer graphics of a pink human brain looking forward to a plate with doughnuts. OsakaWayne Studios/Getty Images hide caption

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Natural, organic, sea, white salt, poured from a fallen salt shaker, on a black table or background. The concept of cooking healthy food, cosmetology. Aleksandr Zubkov/Getty Images hide caption

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TASTE BUDDIES: Pucker Up! It's The Science Of Sour

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Miso soup is one dish made with dashi, a Japanese broth packed with umami flavor. Yagi-Studio/Getty Images hide caption

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TASTE BUDDIES: The Origins Of Umami

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Boxes of lemons are packaged for sale at the New Covent Garden fruit and vegetable wholesale market, Nine Elms on February 4, 2017 in London, England. Jack Taylor/Getty Images hide caption

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Jack Taylor/Getty Images

A color-enhanced scanning electron micrograph of the surface of the human tongue. Taste buds are shown in purple. Doctors have known that as people pack on the pounds, their sense of taste diminishes. New research in mice suggests one reason why: Inflammation brought on by obesity may be killing taste buds. Omikron Omikron/Getty Images/Science Source hide caption

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Omikron Omikron/Getty Images/Science Source

Flavor wheels stem from lexicons, the carefully, often scientifically selected words used to describe a product, be it food, wine, carpet cleaner or dog food. Scott Suchman/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Suchman/The Washington Post/Getty Images

"Probably females are better at accessing olfactory memories, but I don't know why," says Robert Bath, a wine and beverage studies professor at the Culinary Institute of America in Napa Valley. "Maybe men don't pay as much attention?" Maria Fabrizio for NPR hide caption

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Maria Fabrizio for NPR