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Social psychologist Keith Payne says we have a bias toward comparing ourselves to people who have more than us, rather than those who have less Marcus Butt/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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A young Maya Shankar. Courtesy of Maya Shankar hide caption

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Courtesy of Maya Shankar

Olutosin Oduwole at his home in New Jersey in 2016. Shankar Vedantam/NPR hide caption

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Shankar Vedantam/NPR

Red S-shaped rope being tugged by three different knots. Each knot is a different color — blue, orange, and green. Yellow background. Richard Drury/Getty Images hide caption

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Taken in aggregate, the billions of online searches we make every day say a lot about our most private thoughts and biases. Lee Woodgate/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Lee Woodgate/Getty Images/Ikon Images

I, Robot: Our Changing Relationship With Technology

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Finding Meaning At Work: How We Shape And Think About Our Jobs

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The belief that vaccines cause autism has persisted, even though the facts paint an entirely different story. Renee Klahr hide caption

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Renee Klahr

Our voices convey so much more than just information. They can tell other people something essential about who we are. Angela Hsieh hide caption

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Angela Hsieh

Psychologist Phil Tetlock thinks the parable of the fox and the hedgehog represents two different cognitive styles. "The hedgehogs are more the big idea people, more decisive," while the foxes are more accepting of nuance, more open to using different approaches with different problems. Renee Klahr hide caption

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Renee Klahr

Hal Herzog, a professor of psychology at Western Carolina University, says the more we attribute humanlike qualities to animals, the more ethically problematic it may be to keep them as pets. Angela Hsieh/NPR hide caption

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Angela Hsieh/NPR

Our Animal Instincts

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A young Maya Shankar. Courtesy of Maya Shankar hide caption

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Courtesy of Maya Shankar

Fresh Starts: Tales Of Renewal For A New Year

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Would you eat a cricket? Parth Shah hide caption

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Parth Shah
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Watch Your Mouth

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Psychologist Phil Tetlock thinks the parable of the fox and the hedgehog represents two different cognitive styles. "The hedgehogs are more the big idea people, more decisive," while the foxes are more accepting of nuance, more open to using different approaches with different problems. Renee Klahr hide caption

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Renee Klahr

The Fox And The Hedgehog: The Triumphs And Perils Of Going Big

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Alan Alda Jhon Ochoa, Photo-illustration: Renee Klahr/NPR hide caption

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Jhon Ochoa, Photo-illustration: Renee Klahr/NPR

Alan Alda Wants Us To Have Better Conversations

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Researcher Elizabeth Currid-Halkett says celebrity can be boiled down to a simple formula. Caiaimage/Sam Edwards/Getty Images/Caiaimage hide caption

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Never Go To Vegas, And Other Unspoken Rules Of Being An A-Lister

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