eye eye
Stories About

eye

Science writer David Baron witnesses his first total solar eclipse in Aruba, 1998. He says seeing one is "like you've left the solar system and are looking back from some other world." Paul Myers hide caption

toggle caption
Paul Myers

The physical sensations of watching a total solar eclipse

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1199886060/1241747030" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

This family photo shows Aaron James and his daughter, Allie in September 2022. Aaron was working for a power line company in June 2021 when he was shocked by a live wire. He nearly died. Ultimately he lost his left arm, requiring a prosthetic. His damaged left eye was so painful it had to be removed. AP hide caption

toggle caption
AP

Gregory Matthews has glaucoma and uses prescription eyedrops. The dropper's opening creates a bigger drop than he needs, causing him to run out of his medication before the prescription is ready to refill. Matt Roth for ProPublica hide caption

toggle caption
Matt Roth for ProPublica

Drug Companies Make Eyedrops Too Big, And You Pay For The Waste

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/558358137/558706881" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A startup called Opternative offers online vision tests using a computer and a smartphone. Coutesy of Opternative hide caption

toggle caption
Coutesy of Opternative

Online Eye Exam Site Makes Waves In Eye Care Industry

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/479346651/479421712" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript