Iran nuclear deal Iran nuclear deal

President Trump announced he would not recertify the Iran nuclear deal and warned that the U.S. could withdraw from it "at any time." Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

President Trump on Friday stated that the Iran nuclear deal is not in the best interests for the security of the United States, but stopped short of withdrawing from the 2015 agreement. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

President Trump announces he will not recertify the Iran nuclear deal on Friday, ahead of Sunday's deadline. The deal is still in effect, but the president is pushing for a new strategy. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

Iranian President Hasan Rouhani delivers a speech during the opening session of the new Parliament in Tehran in 2016. Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images

What Is — And Isn't — Covered By The Iranian Nuclear Deal

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President Hassan Rouhani addresses Iran's Parliament on Aug. 20. He said the top foreign policy priority for his new government would be to protect the nuclear deal. STR/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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STR/AFP/Getty Images

Secretary of State Rex Tillerson speaks at a 2017 Trafficking in Persons Report ceremony at the State Department, in June. On Monday, Tillerson recertified Iran's compliance with the 2015 nuclear deal. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

A woman in Tehran stands in front of a wall plastered with posters of Iranian President Hassan Rouhani, whose re-election bid will have its decisive moment Friday — unless, of course, the voting results in a runoff. Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images

U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, pictured in Moscow last week, says Iran has been abiding by a 2015 nuclear agreement. But he told Congress in a letter that the Trump administration was reviewing the lifting of U.S. sanctions against Iran to determine if that was in U.S. interests. Ivan Sekretarev/AP hide caption

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Ivan Sekretarev/AP

Missiles on display in northern Tehran in 2014. A reported missile test by Iran on Sunday has led some American officials to accuse the country of violating a U.N. resolution that accompanied the 2015 nuclear deal. Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images

Then-Secretary of State Madeleine Albright and North Korean leader Kim Jong Il toast in Pyongyang on Oct. 24, 2000. The U.S. and North Korea signed an agreement six years earlier to curb North Korea's nuclear activities in exchange for aid, but it collapsed in 2002, during the Bush administration. Chien-Min Chung/AP hide caption

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Chien-Min Chung/AP

Will Iran Deal Meet The Same Fate As A Past U.S.-North Korean Arms Deal?

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Richard Ratcliffe, second from right, delivers a petition to the British prime minister's official residence calling on Iran to release his wife, Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe. She was stopped in April at the airport in Tehran with the couple's 2-year-old daughter as they tried to return to Britain after a family holiday. Ratcliffe was at the United Nations this week appealing for their release. Carl Court/Getty Images hide caption

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Carl Court/Getty Images

As Iran's President Touts Openness, Britons Appeal For Release Of Prisoners

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Secretary of State John Kerry talks with Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif in Vienna on Jan. 16, after the International Atomic Energy Agency verified that Iran met all conditions under the nuclear deal. The accord is now 1-year-old. Iran is seen as abiding by requirements of the deal, but its relations with the U.S. and other rivals have not improved on other fronts. Kevin Lamarque/AP hide caption

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Kevin Lamarque/AP

Chicago-based aircraft manufacturer Boeing would not divulge details about its deal with Iran Air — not the number of aircraft involved, the specific models or the price tag. Simon Dawson/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Simon Dawson/Bloomberg via Getty Images

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry (right), along with British Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond (left), speak to reporters in London on May 12. They tried to assure European banks they won't be penalized for conducting legitimate business with Iran. Critics say it should not be up to the U.S. to encourage investment in Iran. Josh Lederman/AP hide caption

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Josh Lederman/AP

John Kerry's Awkward Push For Investment In Iran

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CIA Director John Brennan discussed ISIS, the FBI-Apple dispute over an iPhone, the state of the Iran nuclear deal, and his future plans as President Obama's term draws to a close. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

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Ariel Zambelich/NPR

Listen To Part 1 On 'Morning Edition'

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Iranian shopkeepers in the main bazaar in the capital, Tehran, in September. Iranians are eager for economic sanctions to be lifted and have been moving quickly to meet their obligations under a nuclear deal, according to analysts monitoring the agreement. Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Atta Kenare/AFP/Getty Images

As Iran Moves Swiftly On Nuclear Deal, Sanctions Could Go Soon

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