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Brandie Diamond describes herself as a "transgender truck driver/chef/Jill-of-all-trades." But her career in trucking began in the mid-1980s, and she hadn't come out as trans back then. Meg Vogel for NPR hide caption

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Meg Vogel for NPR

What women truckers can tell us about living and working alone

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Brandie Diamond stands by her FedEx Custom Critical truck in a Walmart Supercenter parking lot in Columbus, Ohio. Meg Vogel for NPR hide caption

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Meg Vogel for NPR

Alone@Work: Miles To Go Before I'm Me

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Trucks line up Dec. 1 to have containers loaded from a stack at the Norfolk International Terminal in Norfolk, Va. Walmart workers who once unloaded trucks now have a chance to drive them thanks to a new company training program. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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Steve Helber/AP

An inflatable snowman and candy canes are part of the decorations that adorn houses in Brooklyn's Dyker Heights neighborhood on Dec. 22, 2020 in New York. A shopping surge by households this year has snarled up global supply chains, and now the race is on to get products on shelves in time for Christmas. Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

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Mark Lennihan/AP

The race is on to save Christmas as retailers fight the supply chain crunch

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Fishermen unload and sort the day's catch from the fishing boat Laurent-Geoffrey at Quai Gambetta in Boulogne-sur-Mer, France. Pete Kiehart for NPR hide caption

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Pete Kiehart for NPR

Brexit: French Fishermen Worry What A Trade Deal May Mean For Them

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A pre-pandemic Seattle supermarket boasts row after row of prepackaged snacks. Even before the coronavirus pandemic put extra stress on grocery workers, keeping shelves stocked with the variety that Americans have come to expect took a hidden toll on producers, distributors and retail workers, says author Benjamin Lorr. David Ryder/Getty Images hide caption

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David Ryder/Getty Images

A truck leaves the highway at the Hefner Road exit of I-35 in Oklahoma City on March 20. Truckers say that the impact from the coronavirus is twofold: Some have more loads now because of shortages, while others say that their customers are not ordering and have cut their runs down. Sue Ogrocki/AP hide caption

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Sue Ogrocki/AP

Safety driver Jeff Runions with one of Starsky Robotics' autonomous testing trucks. Alexi Horowitz-Ghazi/NPR hide caption

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Alexi Horowitz-Ghazi/NPR

A Career Trucker Helps To Steer The Path For Self-Driving Trucks

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Otto developed technology to allow big-rig trucks to drive themselves. Uber, another transportation company working on self-driving technology, acquired Otto in August. Tony Avelar/AP hide caption

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Tony Avelar/AP

For The Long Haul, Self-Driving Trucks May Pave The Way Before Cars

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Idella Hansen and Sandi Talbott, at an annual trucking convention in Dallas. StoryCorps hide caption

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StoryCorps

On The Road For Decades — And Not Stopping Anytime Soon

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Sam Tahour, district manager for Travel Centers of America, stands next to a travel plaza in Oak Grove, Mo. Tahour was trained as part of a new effort to identify and stop sex trafficking at truck stops. Frank Morris/KCUR hide caption

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Frank Morris/KCUR

Truckers Take The Wheel In Effort To Halt Sex Trafficking

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During a Dec. 5 protest against new highway fees in Moscow, a Russian Communist Party supporter stood in front of a banner with portraits of wealthy businessmen including billionaire Arkady Rotenberg, far left. Rotenberg's son, Igor Rotenberg, controls the business operating the new road fee system. Sergei Ilnitsky/EPA /LANDOV hide caption

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Sergei Ilnitsky/EPA /LANDOV

In A Rare Protest, Russian Truckers Rally Against Putin's Highway Tax

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"Trucking is not a 9 to 5 job. It's really a 24-hour operation," says Cody Blankenship, owner of 4BTrucking, which operates out of Waco, Texas. He logs about 100,000 miles a year on the road. A planned run during harvest time this year will keep him away from home, and his young daughters, for a five-week stretch. Courtesy of overdriveonline.com hide caption

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Courtesy of overdriveonline.com