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WASHINGTON, DC - NOVEMBER 15: U.S. Surgeon General Jerome Adams testifies before the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee in the Dirksen Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill November 15, 2017 in Washington, DC. Adams testified about community-level health promotion programs and businesses that offer incentives to employees that practice healthy lifestyles. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Surgeon General Urges More Americans To Carry Opioid Antidote

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A young man uses heroin under a bridge in the Kensington section of Philadelphia, a neighborhood that has become a hub for heroin use. The economic costs of the epidemic are mounting, researchers say, as the U.S. loses more and more workers in their prime. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

An overdose rescue kit handed out at an overdose prevention class this summer in New York City includes an injectable form of the drug naloxone. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Counting The Heavy Cost Of Care In The Age Of Opioids

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A man checks out an anti-overdose kit he was given at a clinic. With America confronting an opioid epidemic, Walgreens says it will stock naloxone spray at all of its pharmacies. Richard Lautens/Toronto Star via Getty Images hide caption

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Richard Lautens/Toronto Star via Getty Images

First responders in Washington, D.C., bring naloxone on every emergency call. Shelby Knowles/NPR hide caption

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Shelby Knowles/NPR

First Responders Spending More On Overdose Reversal Drug

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Andrea Towson used heroin for more than three decades. After a near-death experience with fentanyl, she sought help. Shelby Knowles/NPR hide caption

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Shelby Knowles/NPR

'That Fentanyl — That's Death': A Story Of Recovery In Baltimore

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Some medical professionals say declaring a national emergency could make Naloxone, a drug that treats opioid overdoses, more readily available. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Should The Opioid Crisis Be Declared A National Emergency?

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Medicaid spending on medications used to treat opioid addiction has risen sharply in recent years. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

People in their mid-40s to mid-60s are more likely than any other group to be prescribed opioids with benzodiazepines. Both kinds of drugs can hamper breathing and mixing them is especially risky. Erwin Wodicka/iStock hide caption

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Erwin Wodicka/iStock

In Prince's Age Group, Risk Of Opioid Overdose Climbs

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"The Block is like living," outreach worker Nathan Fields says. "These relationships, you've got to keep them flourishing." Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Pitching Health Care In Baltimore's Red Light District

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In Boston, Edmund Hassan, a deputy superintendent of emergency medical services, and his colleagues regularly revive people who have overdosed on opioids. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

Reversing Opioid Overdoses Saves Lives But Isn't A Cure-All

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Katie Serio, director of treatment and prevention at the Council on Alcohol and Substance Abuse of Livingston County, N.Y., trains a group of school nurses to use the overdose antidote naloxone at Dansville High School. Michelle Faust/Side Effects Public Media hide caption

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Michelle Faust/Side Effects Public Media

School Nurses Stock Drug To Reverse Opioid Overdoses

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A nasal spray version of the overdose-reversing drug naloxone demonstrated at police headquarters in Quincy, Mass., in 2014. Gretchen Ertl/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Gretchen Ertl/Reuters/Landov

Price Soars For Key Weapon Against Heroin Overdoses

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Health worker Nathan Fields (left), Rep. Donna Edwards and Dr. Leana Wen show people how to use naloxone on a street corner in Sandtown, a Baltimore neighborhood where drug activity is common. Andrea Hsu/NPR hide caption

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Andrea Hsu/NPR

Baltimore Fights Heroin Overdoses With Antidote Outreach

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