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fossil fuels

Ty Cordingly and his dad at a local Gillette diner. He's seen coworkers leave the state for jobs and thinks Wyoming relies too much on the energy industry. Cooper McKim/Wyoming Public Media hide caption

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Cooper McKim/Wyoming Public Media

'It's The Stone Age Of Fossil Fuels': Coal Bankruptcy Tests Wyoming Town

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Pumpjacks like this one dot the desert of southeast New Mexico, as oil and gas companies rush to develop one of the largest oil reserves in the world. Nathan Rott/NPR hide caption

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Nathan Rott/NPR

In Midst Of An Oil Boom, New Mexico Sets Bold New Climate Goals

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The Garzweiler coal mine and power plant near the city of Grevenbroich in western Germany. Plans to expand an open-pit brown coal mine in the eastern German village of Pödelwitz have prompted protests. Martin Meissner/AP hide caption

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Martin Meissner/AP

Germany Bulldozes Old Villages For Coal Despite Lower Emissions Goals

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An artist's rendering of the Chicxulub impact crater on Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula from an asteroid that slammed into the planet some 65 million years ago. SPL/Science Source hide caption

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SPL/Science Source

Asteroid Impact That Wiped Out The Dinosaurs Also Caused Abrupt Global Warming

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"Keep it in the ground" activists protesting the Bayou Bridge Pipeline on February 17, 2018 near Belle Rose, Louisiana. Travis Lux/WWNO hide caption

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Travis Lux/WWNO

'Keep It In The Ground' Activists Optimistic Despite Oil Boom

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France's President Emmanuel Macron, center, Arnold Schwarzenegger, left, and Prime Minister of Belgium Charles Michel, right, pose for a photo in front of the Eiffel Tower while aboard a boat cruising on the Seine River after the One Planet Summit, Paris, Tuesday, Dec. 12. Thibault Camus/AP hide caption

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Thibault Camus/AP

The Exxon Mobil shareholder vote is seen as a victory for environmental activists and one that is aimed at getting the company to consider "material risk," according to The Dallas Morning News. Mark Humphrey/AP hide caption

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Mark Humphrey/AP

Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt arrives for meetings with President-elect Donald Trump at Trump Tower in New York City. Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/AFP/Getty Images

A view of greater New York City from the International Space Station. NASA hide caption

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NASA

Reinventing Infrastructure: How Hard Is It?

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New Mexico's largest electric provider — the coal-fired San Juan Generating Station near Farmington — has been defending a plan to replace part of an aging coal-fired power plant with a mix of more coal, natural gas, nuclear and solar power. Susan Montoya Bryan/AP hide caption

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Susan Montoya Bryan/AP

Climate Change Is Not Our Fault

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The Antarctic ice sheet stores more than half of Earth's fresh water. Scientists wondered how much of it would melt if people burned all the fossil fuels on the planet. UPI /Landov hide caption

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UPI /Landov

What Would Happen If We Burned Up All Of Earth's Fossil Fuels?

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