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The Russian Progress MS-21 cargo craft is pictured on Oct. 28, 2022, shortly after docking at the International Space Station. On Saturday, the Russian space corporation said the spacecraft lost cabin pressure. NASA hide caption

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NASA

The International Space Station is pictured from the SpaceX Crew Dragon Endeavour on Nov. 8, 2021. On Monday, the ISS had to fire its thrusters to avoid space junk. NASA Johnson Space Center via Flickr Creative Commons hide caption

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NASA Johnson Space Center via Flickr Creative Commons

U.S. Space Shuttle Commander Terrence Wilcutt (right) and Mir Commander Anatoly Solovyev hug after opening the hatches between the space shuttle Endeavour and the Russian Space station Mir Saturday, Jan. 24, 1998, in this image from television NASA via AP hide caption

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NASA via AP

The International Space Station depends on a mix of U.S. and Russian parts. "I hope we can hold it together as long as we can," says former NASA astronaut Scott Kelly. NASA hide caption

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NASA

Russia's war in Ukraine is threatening an outpost of cooperation in space

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In this photo made available by NASA, commercial crew astronauts, from left, European Space Agency astronaut Matthias Maurer, and NASA astronauts Tom Marshburn, Raja Chari, and Kayla Barron, pose for a photo in their Dragon spacesuits during a fit check aboard the International Space Station's Harmony module on April 21, 2022. AP hide caption

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AP

The International Space Station is seen from NASA space shuttle Endeavour after the station and shuttle began their post-undocking relative separation in space on May 29, 2011. NASA/Getty Images hide caption

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NASA/Getty Images

What will happen to the International Space Station when it is retired?

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A hatch chile aboard the International Space Station NASA hide caption

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NASA

Opinion: Fine dining on the International Space Station

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Wang Yaping is one of three astronauts aboard the Shenzhou 13 spaceflight mission. She will be the first female astronaut to visit the latest Chinese space station, but she has the most space experience of the three. Xinhua News Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Xinhua News Agency via Getty Images

India launched a ballistic missile defense interceptor last week — and NASA says it created dangerous debris in orbit. "We have identified 400 pieces of orbital debris from that one event," NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine said. Handout/Reuters hide caption

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Handout/Reuters

SpaceX says its Falcon Heavy rocket, shown here in an artist's rendering, will be used in the mission to the moon. SpaceX hide caption

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SpaceX

SpaceX Announces Plans To Send Two Customers To The Moon

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NASA astronaut Shane Kimbrough shows a pouch of turkey he will be preparing for his crew in celebration of the Thanksgiving holiday, aboard the International Space Station. AP hide caption

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AP

Visitors stand beside a model of the Tiangong-1 space lab in 2010, at the 8th China International Aviation and Aerospace Exhibition in Zhuhai, China. The real Tiangong-1 was launched into space in 2011 and will be returning to Earth next year — with some observers speculating China has lost control over the spacecraft. Kin Cheung/AP hide caption

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Kin Cheung/AP

Hurricanes Lester, Madeline and Gaston (from left to right) are seen from the International Space Station on Aug. 30. NASA Johnson YouTube/NASA composite hide caption

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NASA Johnson YouTube/NASA composite

Kelly posted this photo of an aurora taken from the International Space Station to Twitter on Aug. 15, 2015. NASA hide caption

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NASA

Scott Kelly Reflects On His Year Off The Planet

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