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Volkswagen emissions scandal

Audi's chief executive, Rupert Stadler, pictured at the Annual Media Conference of Volkswagen AG last month, was arrested Monday. Ulrich Baumgarten/U. Baumgarten via Getty Images hide caption

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Ulrich Baumgarten/U. Baumgarten via Getty Images

Reacquired Volkswagen and Audi diesel cars sit in a desert graveyard near Victorville, Calif., on Wednesday. Volkswagen AG has paid more than $7.4 billion to buy back about 350,000 vehicles, the automaker said in a recent court filing. Lucy Nicholson/Reuters hide caption

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Lucy Nicholson/Reuters

Owners of vehicles with larger VW diesel engines that have emissions-cheating software could get their cars fixed or bought back, the company says. Here, a man walks by an Audi diesel at company meetings last summer. Alexander Koerner/Getty Images hide caption

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Alexander Koerner/Getty Images

Volkswagen has agreed to plead guilty to three criminal felony counts as part of the settlement announced Wednesday by the Justice Department. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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Damian Dovarganes/AP

A Volkswagen Touareg diesel is seen being tested at a federal facility in Michigan last year. Volkswagen has reached a tentative deal with its U.S. dealers to compensate them for plummeting sales as a result of the company's emissions cheating scandal. Carlos Osorio/AP hide caption

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Carlos Osorio/AP

Volkswagen used six different "defeat devices" to purposefully skirt U.S. emissions rules, new lawsuits say. Here, VW cars are seen in a delivery tower in Wolfsburg, Germany, earlier this year. Markus Schreiber/AP hide caption

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Markus Schreiber/AP

Former FBI Director Robert Mueller, right, arrives for a court hearing in San Francisco Thursday. Mueller has been overseeing talks about a settlement between Volkswagen, the U.S. government, and the car company's customers. Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

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Jeff Chiu/AP

Volkswagen CEO Matthias Mueller speaks to the media Sunday in Detroit, apologizing for the scandal that has plunged the German auto giant into crisis. Paul Sancya/AP hide caption

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Paul Sancya/AP

'We Didn't Lie,' Volkswagen CEO Says Of Emissions Scandal

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John Swanton of the California Air Resources Board, explaining how a 2013 Volkswagen with a diesel engine is evaluated at an emissions test lab. The U.S. has filed a civil complaint against Volkswagen over emissions cheating in its diesel cars. Nick Ut/AP hide caption

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Nick Ut/AP

Volkswagen Chairman Hans Dieter Pötsch (left) and CEO Matthias Müller attend a news conference Thursday in Wolfsburg, Germany, to announce the latest update in the company's handling of its emissions scandal. Carsten Koall/Getty Images hide caption

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Carsten Koall/Getty Images