forced arbitration forced arbitration
Stories About

forced arbitration

CEO Dara Khosrowshahi has said he is committed to changing the company's culture to have a new emphasis on accountability and earning trust. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

A recent study from the University of Southern California found that prices charged by hospitals in the Sutter Health system are about 25 percent higher than those of other hospitals in California. Ken James/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Ken James/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Big Hospital Network Cracks Down On The Right To Sue

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/499146270/501053303" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Consumer Financial Protection Bureau Director Richard Cordray says financial firms use arbitration to "sidestep the legal system [and] avoid accountability." But industry officials say a proposed ban on mandatory arbitration clauses will lead to frivolous legal action. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Steve Helber/AP

New Rule Would Make It Easier For Consumers To Sue Banks

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/476897917/476898528" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Have We Lost A Constitutional Right In The Fine Print?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/455749456/455785254" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Proponents of arbitration say the system is more efficient than going to court for both sides, but arbitration can be costly, too. And a 2009 study showed the typical awards in nursing home cases are about 35 percent lower than the plaintiff would get if the case went to court. Heinz Linke/Westend61/Corbis hide caption

toggle caption
Heinz Linke/Westend61/Corbis

Suing A Nursing Home Could Get Easier Under Proposed Federal Rules

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/449957318/450030427" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Consumer Financial Protection Bureau Director Richard Cordray, center, participates in a panel discussion in March. His agency is considering banning financial companies from routinely requiring consumers to sign away the right to sue. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Steve Helber/AP