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coral reefs

Corals around the world have been dying because of warming waters and pollution. Some researchers hope they can reverse the trend by growing new corals in the lab. Albert Kok/Wikimedia Commons hide caption

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Albert Kok/Wikimedia Commons

As Corals Wither Around The World, Scientists Try IVF

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An orange clownfish, Amphiprion percula, lives in symbiosis with a host anemone on the Great Barrier Reef. Alejandro Usobiaga/Scientific Reports hide caption

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Alejandro Usobiaga/Scientific Reports

Aerial view of the Heart Reef, part of the Great Barrier Reef Arterra/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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Arterra/UIG via Getty Images

While Corals Die Along The Great Barrier Reef, Humans Struggle To Adjust

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Graveyard of Staghorn coral, Yonge reef, Northern Great Barrier Reef, October 2016. Greg Torda /ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies hide caption

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Greg Torda /ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies

The Great Barrier Reef off the coast of Queensland, Australia, in August 2009. Scientists say they have discovered a second, enormous reef in the deeper water behind the Great Barrier Reef. Phil Walter/Getty Images hide caption

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Phil Walter/Getty Images

A generally healthy and diverse assemblage of coral is seen (at left) within a grassy part of the inner reef flat of the Pag-asa Reef of the South China Sea. (At right) Coral has been killed after years of giant clam "chopper" boat operations on an unnamed reef to the east. John McManus/Rosenstiel School, University of Miami hide caption

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John McManus/Rosenstiel School, University of Miami

One Result Of China's Buildup In South China Sea: Environmental Havoc

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A marine biologist is engulfed by a school of barracuda and jacks as she conducts reef surveys in Kimbe Bay, Papua New Guinea. Tane Sinclair-Taylor/Nature Publishing Group hide caption

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Tane Sinclair-Taylor/Nature Publishing Group

A map of the Amazon shelf showing the newly discovered reef structures in yellow. Courtesy of Carlos Rezende (UENF) and Fabiano Thompson (UFRJ) hide caption

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Courtesy of Carlos Rezende (UENF) and Fabiano Thompson (UFRJ)

Partially bleached coral in Kaneohe, Hawaii. Coral reefs worldwide are at risk of damage from the suncscreen ingredient oxybenzone. Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources/Dan Dennison/AP hide caption

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Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources/Dan Dennison/AP