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Alex Azar, secretary of Health and Human Services, announced a new rule requiring drugmakers to publish drug list prices in TV ads. Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, will lead the Senate Finance Committee's questioning Tuesday of executives from pharmacy benefit managers about drug costs. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Drug Industry Middlemen To Be Questioned By Senate Committee

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A medical assistant administers insulin to an adolescent patient who has Type 1 diabetes. Cigna's pharmacy benefit manager, Express Scripts, says it covers 1.4 million people who take insulin. Picture Alliance/Getty Images hide caption

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Picture Alliance/Getty Images

One of the Trump administration's proposals would change the prices Medicare pays for certain prescription drugs by factoring in the average prices Europeans pay for the same medicines. Simon Dawson/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Simon Dawson/Bloomberg via Getty Images

It Will Take More Than Transparency To Reduce Drug Prices, Economists Say

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Eli Lilly and Company, based in Indianapolis, is rolling out a half-price version of its insulin Humalog that will be sold as a generic. Darron Cummings/AP hide caption

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Darron Cummings/AP

How Much Difference Will Eli Lilly's Half-Price Insulin Make?

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The Food and Drug Administration suggests consumers who get prescription drugs mailed to them via CanaRx are at risk of getting mislabeled or counterfeit drugs. But consumer watchdog groups say the FDA has supplied no evidence that's happened. Hero Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Hero Images/Getty Images

Drug prices in the United States support spending on research and development, said AbbVie CEO Richard Gonzalez (far left) in testimony by drug company executives before the Senate Finance Committee on Tuesday. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., left, and Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, right, chairman of the Senate Finance Committee, asked drug company CEOs some tough questions about drug prices on Tuesday during a hearing before the Senate Finance Committee. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Sen. Estes Kefauver, D-Tenn., (left) and Sen. Everett Dirksen, R-Ill., (second from left) clashed at the reopening of a Senate drug investigation in 1960 over whether witnesses could be forced to reveal business secrets while testifying. Bettmann Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Bettmann Archive/Getty Images

First lady Melania Trump with 10-year-old Grace Eline, a guest of President Trump at the State of the Union address Tuesday. Grace was diagnosed with brain cancer last year. Trump cited her experience in calling for more research into childhood cancer treatments. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar delivers remarks to reporters while participating in a roundtable about health care prices at the White House on Jan. 23. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

While some new drugs entering the market are driving up prices for consumers, drug companies are also hiking prices on older drugs. Sigrid Olsson/PhotoAlto/Getty Images hide caption

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Sigrid Olsson/PhotoAlto/Getty Images

Susie Christoff tried several drugs to cope with her painful psoriatic arthritis before finding Cosentyx worked the best. The problem was the cost. Chris Bartlett/for Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Chris Bartlett/for Kaiser Health News

Why The U.S. Remains The Most Expensive Market For 'Biologic' Drugs In The World

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Angela Lautner, who lives in Elsmere, Ky., has Type 1 diabetes and is an advocate for affordable insulin. Maddie McGarvey for NPR hide caption

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Maddie McGarvey for NPR

'We're Fighting For Our Lives': Patients Protest Sky-High Insulin Prices

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President Trump announces a plan to overhaul how Medicare pays for certain drugs during a Thursday speech at the Department of Health and Human Services in Washington, D.C. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Marilyn Bartlett spent two years running Montana's employee health plan. She made better deals with hospitals and drug benefits managers and saved the plan from bankruptcy. Mike Albans for NPR hide caption

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Mike Albans for NPR

A Tough Negotiator Proves Employers Can Bargain Down Health Care Prices

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Intermountain Healthcare, whose Intermountain Medical Center Patient Tower in Murray, Utah, is seen here, is a leader in the generic drug company being launched by hospitals. Courtesy of Intermountain Healthcare hide caption

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Courtesy of Intermountain Healthcare

Many Medicare patients don't realize they can sometimes pay less out of pocket for a prescription drug if they pay cash, instead of the insurance copay. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images