mass shooting mass shooting

California Shootings Sprang From Domestic Violence, Restraining Order

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Priscilla Olivas, 19, of Las Vegas lights a candle at a street vigil for shooting victims along the Las Vegas Strip. Olivas was part of the cleaning crew at the concert when a gunman opened fire Sunday. Salwan Georges/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Salwan Georges/The Washington Post/Getty Images

The Big Life Of John Phippen

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Police run to cover at the scene of Sunday night's mass shooting in Las Vegas. In the opening moments of the shooting, details were sparse and confusion ran high — all while the bullets rained down. John Locher/AP hide caption

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John Locher/AP

The opening minutes: 10:02 - 10:32 p.m.

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People cross the Las Vegas Strip where a lone gunman opened fire on the audience at the Route 91 Harvest country music festival Sunday night. The gunman, identified as Stephen Paddock, 64, of Mesquite, Nev., fired from a room on the 32nd floor of the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino. David Becker/Getty Images hide caption

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David Becker/Getty Images

Concertgoers run from the Route 91 Harvest music festival in Las Vegas after the gunfire broke out. By the time the night was over, at least 58 people had died and more than 500 people were wounded in the shooting. David Becker/Getty Images hide caption

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David Becker/Getty Images

Terry Sullivan holds a picture of her son Alex and his father, Tom. Alex was killed on July 20, 2012, in a shooting at a movie theater in Aurora, Colo. He was there to celebrate his 27th birthday with friends and watch the latest Batman film. Courtesy of StoryCorps hide caption

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Courtesy of StoryCorps

Returning To Row 12, Seat 12, Again, As Aurora Shooting Anniversary Nears

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Protesters call for House Speaker Paul Ryan to allow votes on gun violence prevention legislation in Washington, D.C., on July 6. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

After Mass Shootings, Action On Gun Legislation Soars At State Level

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People show their support for Javier Jorge-Reyes, who died in the attack at Pulse, after it was learned that a hate group was possibly going to disrupt his wake. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Orlando Rises To Meet The Challenges Of An Awful Week

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A woman walks with a sign to protest gun violence and call for sensible gun laws outside the White House on Monday. Molly Riley/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Molly Riley/AFP/Getty Images

Assault Rifle Bans Find Life On State Level

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Orlando (who did not want to provide his last name), who was injured in the mass shooting at the Pulse Nightclub, cries as he attends a memorial service at the Joy MCC Church for the victims of the mass shooting. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Mourners left flowers and other mementos in front of Charleston's Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in the days following the June 17, 2015, mass shooting. Nine worshippers were gunned down during Bible study in what authorities say was a racially motivated attack on the historic black church. Debbie Elliott/NPR hide caption

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Debbie Elliott/NPR

While Grieving Continues, Church Shooting Was Charleston's Call To Action

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Counselors will be on site as employees return to work at the Inland Regional Center, the site of a mass shooting last month in San Bernardino, Calif. "I honestly expect those people that even think they're healed are going to come back and they're going to be jolted right back to that day as we go through those processes of grief and loss," said Vince Toms, a manager. Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

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Jae C. Hong/AP

Site Of Mass Shooting In San Bernardino Slated To Reopen

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San Bernardino Police Lt. Mike Madden was one of the first officers on the scene of Wednesday's mass shooting. Chris Carlson/AP hide caption

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Chris Carlson/AP

Listen to Lt. Mike Madden

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