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processed meat

A new set of analyses contradict the current dietary recommendations to limit red and processed meats. PeopleImages/Getty Images hide caption

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PeopleImages/Getty Images

No Need To Cut Back On Red Meat? Controversial New 'Guidelines' Lead To Outrage

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Duped In The Deli Aisle? 'No Nitrates Added' Labels Are Often Misleading

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Processed meats, including hot dogs and bacon, cook in a frying pan. A new study of 80,000 people finds that those who ate the most red meat — especially processed meats such as bacon and hot dogs — had a higher risk of premature death compared with those who cut back. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

If you cook meat too long, at too high a temperature, the chemical reaction that creates tasty flavor and aroma compounds keeps going, creating other compounds. Some of those compounds can be carcinogenic when we consume them in high-enough concentrations. Morgan McCloy/NPR hide caption

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Morgan McCloy/NPR

Turning Down The Heat When Cooking Meat May Reduce Cancer Risk

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How many hot dogs are safe to eat? We tackle your questions about an expert panel's conclusion that processed meats are carcinogenic. iStockphoto hide caption

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Processed And Red Meat Could Cause Cancer? Your Questions Answered

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The World Health Organization has put bacon, hot dogs and sausages in the same category of cancer risk as tobacco smoking. Anokarina/Flickr hide caption

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Bad Day For Bacon: Processed Meats Cause Cancer, WHO Says

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