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indigenous peoples

People listen to speakers raising awareness about missing and murdered Indigenous women at a rally at Cal Anderson Park in Seattle prior to the Women's March on January 20. A new report examines missing and murdered Indigenous women in cities, not on reservations, and found local law enforcement agencies often do not adequately track such crimes. Karen Ducey/Getty Images hide caption

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Karen Ducey/Getty Images

Residential roads with no street name or number signs, such as this one in Belcourt, N.D., are common on the Turtle Mountain Indian Reservation. Under recently tightened state rules, voters in North Dakota are required to present identification with a street address, which is a hurdle for Native Americans. Blake Nicholson/AP hide caption

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Blake Nicholson/AP

Vancouver activist and community food developer Ian Marcuse rides a bike outfitted like a spawning salmon created by artist Tamara Unroe. Murray Bush/Wild Salmon Caravan 2018 hide caption

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Murray Bush/Wild Salmon Caravan 2018

A view of Uluru in Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park in Australia in 2013. Uluru, also known as Ayers Rock, is a large sandstone formation situated in central Australia approximately 335 kilometers from Alice Springs. The site and its surrounding area is sacred to the Anangu, the Indigenous people of this area, and is visited by hundreds of thousands of people each year. Mark Kolbe/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Kolbe/Getty Images

Some Mohawks resent any presence of U.S. or Canadian law enforcement in the reservation. But many also say the situation is improving. David Sommerstein/North Country Public Radio hide caption

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David Sommerstein/North Country Public Radio

At U.S.-Canada Border Reservation, Mohawks Say They Face Discrimination

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Jose, a member of the Tsimane group who's 75 years old, stands in the plantain field he planted in Bolivia's Amazon rain forest. Matthieu Paley/National Geographic hide caption

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Matthieu Paley/National Geographic

Who Has The Healthiest Hearts In The World?

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Some of the indigenous corn varieties growing in Taylor Keen's backyard. Cherokee White is a kind of sweet corn with white, purple, and yellower kernels that is ground for flour. Green Oaxacan is processed to make hominy and corn meal. Grant Gerlock/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Grant Gerlock/Harvest Public Media

Olin Tezcatlipoca, left from the Mexica Movement marches with other demonstrators to a statue of Christopher Columbus during a protest against Columbus Day in Grand Park, Los Angeles, last year. Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images

University students who belong to indigenous tribes prepare for a ceremony to affirm their ethnic identity. Taiwan's aboriginal tribes arrived thousands of years before Chinese immigrants, but now account for only 2 percent of the population. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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Anthony Kuhn/NPR

University students who belong to indigenous tribes prepare for a ceremony to affirm their ethnic identity. Taiwan's aboriginal tribes arrived thousands of years before Chinese immigrants, but now account for only 2 percent of the population. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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Anthony Kuhn/NPR

Taiwan's Aborigines Hope A New President Will Bring Better Treatment

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Nuuk, Greenland's capital, hosted about 2,000 people for this year's Arctic Winter Games. It was the biggest event ever held in Greenland. Rebecca Hersher/NPR hide caption

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Rebecca Hersher/NPR

At Arctic Winter Games, Biathlons, Stick Pulls And Sledge Jumps

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