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Zircon: The Keeper Of Earth's Time

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Gabriel Jorgewich Cohen began researching whether turtle species — and other vertebrates thought to be mute — make sounds by recording his own pet turtles. The hydrophone used for recording can be seen on the left. Gabriel Jorgewich Cohen hide caption

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Gabriel Jorgewich Cohen

Dozens of species were assumed to be mute — until they were recorded making sounds

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A male Bougainville Whistler (Pachycephala richardsi), a species endemic to Bougainville Island. This whistler is named after Guy Richards, one of the collectors on the Whitney South Sea Expedition. Iain Woxvold hide caption

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Iain Woxvold

The American Museum of Natural History in New York said Monday it is not the "optimal location" for a gala honoring the president of Brazil. Christina Horsten/picture alliance via Getty Image hide caption

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Christina Horsten/picture alliance via Getty Image

This stone marten knocked out power to the $7 billion Large Hadron Collider particle accelerator in November 2016 when it touched a 18,000-volt transformer. Natural History Museum Rotterdam hide caption

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Natural History Museum Rotterdam

A common house mosquito (Culex pipiens) is about to sink her six-weaponed proboscis into a human arm. This type transmits West Nile virus by biting infected birds, then biting humans. Josh Cassidy/KQED hide caption

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Josh Cassidy/KQED