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In the 1960s, demographers warned that we were on track for a global population explosion. That's not exactly what happened. moodboard - Mike Watson/Getty Images hide caption

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moodboard - Mike Watson/Getty Images

The number of babies born in Japan fell an estimated 5.9% this year, to under 900,000. Here, a baby is held aloft by a sumo wrestler during Tokyo's Nakizumo Festival in April. Tomohiro Ohsumi/Getty Images hide caption

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Tomohiro Ohsumi/Getty Images
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Less Sex, Fewer Babies: Blame The Internet And Career Priorities

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Newborns lie in the nursery ward of a Japanese hospital in 2014. For years, the small, bustling country has seen a decline in its population, leading experts and lawmakers to consider the economic and social repercussions. Haruyoshi Yamaguchi/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Haruyoshi Yamaguchi/Corbis via Getty Images

South Korea's parliament has shortened the maximum workweek amid the country's low birth and productivity rates. Workers are seen here at a factory in Ansan, South Korea, in 2015. Kim Hong-Ji/Reuters hide caption

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Kim Hong-Ji/Reuters

Older Russians relax during a rally in Moscow. Even with steady improvements in life expectancy, Russian men — whose life expectancy was about 56 years in 1995 — today have an average life span of just under 66 years. Men in Europe live on average 10 years longer. Maxim Shipenkov/EPA/Landov hide caption

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Maxim Shipenkov/EPA/Landov

A Post-Soviet Baby Bust Comes Back To Bite Russia

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