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Do you know this goose? Researchers have developed a new facial recognition tool for geese that can ID them based on their beaks. Konrad Lorenz Research Center hide caption

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Konrad Lorenz Research Center

Enhance! HORNK! Artificial intelligence can now ID individual geese

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A tribal fisherman holds a lamprey after it was caught along the Willamette River at the Willamette Falls during the annual Lamprey harvest Friday, June 17, 2016, south of Portland, Ore. Rick Bowmer/AP hide caption

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Rick Bowmer/AP

A Bengal tiger rests in the jungles of Bannerghatta National Park south of Bangalore, India, on July 29, 2015. The number of tigers in the wild has gone up 40% since 2015 — largely because of improvements in monitoring them, according to the International Union for Conservation of Nature. Aijaz Rahi/AP hide caption

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Aijaz Rahi/AP

On May 3, 2022, a partnership led by the Yurok Tribe released two California condors, called A2 and A3, into the wild as part of a decades-long conservation effort." Matt Mais/Yurok Tribe hide caption

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Matt Mais/Yurok Tribe

The Quest To Save The California Condor

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Richard Leakey, Kenyan wildlife conservationist, places a rhino horn to be burned at the zoo in Dvur Kralove, Czech Republic, in 2017. Leakey, known for his fossil-finding and conservation work in his native Kenya, has died at 77. Petr David Josek/AP hide caption

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Petr David Josek/AP

U.S. bald eagle populations have more than quadrupled in the lower 48 states since 2009, according to a new survey from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Prisma Bildagentur/Universal Images Group via Getty Images hide caption

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Prisma Bildagentur/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

Dr. Amir Khalil, a veterinarian from the international animal welfare organization Four Paws International, comforts Kaavan during his examination at the zoo in Islamabad, before leaving for Cambodia. Anjum Naveed/AP hide caption

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Anjum Naveed/AP

'He Will Be A Happier Elephant': Vet Describes What It Was Like To Rescue Kaavan

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In this May 13 photo provided by the National Park Service, this female California condor spreads her wings. Biologists have confirmed that she laid an egg that has hatched and there is a new baby condor at Zion National Park. National Park Service/AP hide caption

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National Park Service/AP

Handlers, known as mahouts, ride elephants along a mountain ridge at the Elephant Conservation Center in Xayaboury, Laos. The center has 29 elephants, most of which spent long careers hauling logs in Laos' logging industry. Ashley Westerman/NPR hide caption

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Ashley Westerman/NPR

Eastern hellbenders live throughout the Appalachian region in the United States. NPR hide caption

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NPR

VIDEO: Snot Otters Get A Second Chance In Ohio

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Conservationist Kuki Gallmann speaks at the launch of World Migratory Bird Day, in April 2006. Gallmann was shot in the stomach Sunday while surveying arson damage to her property. TONY KARUMBA/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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TONY KARUMBA/AFP/Getty Images

A group of men clean a week's haul of seabird eggs. Arthur Bolton/California Academy of Sciences hide caption

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Arthur Bolton/California Academy of Sciences

The Gold-Hungry Forty-Niners Also Plundered Something Else: Eggs

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A wild hedgehog in Snettisham, England. Ian S/Flickr hide caption

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Ian S/Flickr

British Homeowners Build A New Superhighway — For Hedgehogs

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One-quarter of the endangered mountain gorilla population lives in the Virunga National Park, which activists are trying to protect from oil exploration. Brent Stirton/Getty Images hide caption

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Brent Stirton/Getty Images