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The University of Texas-Austin announced Tuesday it is offering full tuition scholarships to in-state undergraduates whose families make $65,000 or less a year. Jon Herskovitz/Reuters hide caption

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Jon Herskovitz/Reuters

Apple already employs more people in Austin than it does in any other city outside of its California headquarters. The new campus will be near its existing facility in the North Austin area. Apple hide caption

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Apple

Cody Wilson, founder of Defense Distributed, at his shop in Austin, Texas, last month. On Tuesday, the company announced Wilson resigned and severed all ties with the company on Sept. 21. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

An antenna tower is seen at the Orchard Plaza apartment building in Austin in 2014, the year the FCC imposed a penalty on the building's owners for operating a pirate radio station. Google Maps/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Google Maps/Screenshot by NPR

Austin's interim police chief Brian Manley briefs the media on March 21, 2018, in Round Rock, Texas. The suspect in a spate of bombing attacks that terrorized Austin blew himself up with an explosive device as authorities closed in. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

Agents from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives join the investigation at a FedEx distribution center in Schertz, Texas, where a package exploded Tuesday. Authorities believe the incident is linked to the recent string of Austin bombings. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

Austin On Edge As Another Explosion Is Reported Late Tuesday

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Police tape marks off a neighborhood in Austin, Texas, where a package bomb went off Sunday night, injuring two people. Drew Anthony Smith/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Anthony Smith/Getty Images

'I'm Ready To Call 911': Austin On Edge With 'Serial Bomber' At Large

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Austin Police Chief Brian Manley (from left), ATF Special Agent in Charge Fred Milanowski and FBI Special Agent in Charge Christopher Combs at a news conference on Monday in Austin, Texas. They said a bomb that exploded Sunday night appeared to have used a tripwire. Suzanne Cordeiro/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Suzanne Cordeiro/AFP/Getty Images

Investigators Say Austin 'Serial Bomber' May Have Used Tripwire In Latest Blast

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Austin City Council member Delia Garza attended the Women's March on Austin with colleagues Pio Renteria and Austin Mayor Steve Adler at the Texas State Capitol in January. Martin do Nascimento/KUT News hide caption

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Martin do Nascimento/KUT News

Facing Discrimination In Public Life, Latinos Stay Positive About Government

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In Austin, A Boom In Short-Term Rentals Brings A Backlash

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A Lyft van sits outside the Austin Convention Center in March, during the 2016 SXSW Festival. The ride-hailing company, along with its competitor Uber, has now vowed to "pause" operations in the city, after Austin voters sided against the ride-hailing apps in a dispute over regulations. Hutton Supancic/Getty Images for SXSW hide caption

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Hutton Supancic/Getty Images for SXSW

Kalu James moved to Austin, Texas, eight years ago, but bought health insurance for the first time this year. Twenty percent of the city's musicians live below the federal poverty line. Veronica Zaragovia/KUT hide caption

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Veronica Zaragovia/KUT

Musicians Struggle To Buy Insurance In A City That Thrives On Music

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