Zika virus Zika virus

French pharmaceutical group Sanofi is expected to receive an exclusive license to market a new Zika vaccine. AFP/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/AFP/Getty Images

States Fear Price Of New Zika Vaccine Will Be More Than They Can Pay

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A groundskeeper at Pinecrest Gardens sprays pesticide to kill mosquitoes in Miami-Dade County, Fla., in 2016. Gaston De Cardenas/Miami Herald/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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Gaston De Cardenas/Miami Herald/TNS via Getty Images

Puerto Rico resident Michelle Flandez caresses her two-month-old son Inti Perez, diagnosed with microcephaly linked to the mosquito-borne Zika virus. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says the Zika virus continues to impact a small number of pregnant women and their babies in the U.S. Carlos Giusti/AP hide caption

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Carlos Giusti/AP

Andie Vaught grasps a stress toy in the shape of a truck as she prepares to have blood drawn as part of a clinical trial for a Zika vaccine at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Md., in November 2016. Allison Shelley/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Allison Shelley/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Keishla Mojica, 23, lives in Cuagas, Puerto Rico. She was infected with Zika virus while pregnant and expects to give birth in early January. Carmen Heredia Rodriguez/KHN hide caption

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Carmen Heredia Rodriguez/KHN

Florida Department of Health workers package a urine test, part of the state's effort to provide free Zika tests to pregnant women. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Anti-Zika advice applied to a wall in front of a housing project in the Puerta de Tierras section of San Juan, Puerto Rico. This public health message was part of an island-wide effort to stem the spread of Zika. Angel Valentin/Getty Images hide caption

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Angel Valentin/Getty Images

Protest signs at the Florida Keys Mosquito Control District board's meeting Saturday in Marathon, Fla. Greg Allen/Greg Allen hide caption

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Greg Allen/Greg Allen

Florida Keys Approves Trial Of Genetically Modified Mosquitoes To Fight Zika

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Joseph Blackman, a Miami-Dade County mosquito control inspector, at work in Miami. Mosquitoes infected with Zika are now spreading the illness in at least four different parts of the city, according to federal health officials. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Zika May Be In The U.S. To Stay

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Florida Department of Health workers at a temporary clinic set up in Miami Beach in September package up a urine sample to be tested for the Zika virus. Pregnant women in Texas and Florida have complained it can take as long as a month or more to get their Zika test results. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

A Florida Department of Health employee processes a urine sample to test for the Zika virus on Sept. 14 in Miami Beach. Lynne Sladky/AP hide caption

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Lynne Sladky/AP

Reporter's Notebook: Pregnant And Caught In Zika Test Limbo

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A pest control worker fumigates a school classroom in Kuala Lumpur on Sept. 4. Malaysia reported its first locally transmitted Zika case on Sept. 3. Mohd Rasfan /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mohd Rasfan /AFP/Getty Images

Does Asia Have A Secret Weapon Against Zika?

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County mosquito control inspector Yasser "Jazz" Compagines sprays a storm drain in Miami Beach to thwart mosquitoes that spread Zika. Alan Diaz/AP hide caption

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Alan Diaz/AP

POLL: Most Americans Want Congress To Make Zika Funding A High Priority

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The FDA says that facilities that collect blood donations throughout the United States should be testing donations for Zika within 12 weeks. Toby Talbot/AP hide caption

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Toby Talbot/AP

All U.S. Blood Donations Should Be Screened For Zika, FDA Says

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Lenroy Watt talks with residents of Miami's Little Haiti about Zika, leaving brochures in Creole about how to prevent the illness, as well as phone numbers for local mosquito control agencies and the county health department. Courtesy of Planned Parenthood hide caption

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Courtesy of Planned Parenthood

Planned Parenthood Joins Campaign To Rid Miami Neighborhoods Of Zika

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A Miami-Dade County mosquito control worker sprays around a school in the Wynwood area of Miami earlier this month. Alan Diaz/AP hide caption

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Alan Diaz/AP

Miami Schools Take Steps To Protect Returning Students From Zika

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