einstein einstein

Astronomers have discovered a star, shown in an artist's rendition, that appears to be orbiting an invisible black hole with about four times the mass of the sun. L. Calçada/ESO hide caption

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L. Calçada/ESO
Ehud Nakar (Tel Aviv), Ore Gottlieb (Tel Aviv), Leo Singer (NASA), Mansi Kasliwal (Caltech), and the GROWTH collaboration YouTube

WATCH: What Happens When 2 Neutron Stars Collide

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Einstein realized that if masses moved about, the deformations in space would also move about, propagating like waves, somewhat like what happens when you throw a rock on a pond. But, gravity being such a weak force, the effect is truly tiny and needs something very dramatic to create a signal we can detect here. This is exactly what was found by LIGO and the Nobel winners. traveler1116/Getty Images hide caption

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traveler1116/Getty Images

Much of Albert Einstein's best-known work, including his famous formula, was conducted in Europe, but when the Nazis came to power, he and other famous scientists brought their talent to the U.S. Selimaksan/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Selimaksan/Getty Images/iStockphoto

This artist's impression shows the surroundings of a supermassive black hole, typical of that found at the heart of many galaxies. The black hole itself is surrounded by a brilliant accretion disc of very hot, infalling material and, further out, a dusty torus. There are also often high-speed jets of material ejected at the black hole's poles that can extend huge distances into space. L. Calçada/ESO hide caption

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L. Calçada/ESO

The star-forming area Messier 17, also known as the Omega Nebula or the Swan Nebula, is a vast region of gas, dust and hot young stars that lies in the heart of the Milky Way in the constellation of Sagittarius. ESO/INAF-VST/OmegaCAM hide caption

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ESO/INAF-VST/OmegaCAM

A simulation shows gravitational waves coming from two black holes as they spiral in together. S. Ossokine , A. Buonanno (MPI for Gravitational Physics)/W. Benger (Airborne Hydro Mapping GmbH) hide caption

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S. Ossokine , A. Buonanno (MPI for Gravitational Physics)/W. Benger (Airborne Hydro Mapping GmbH)

In Milestone, Scientists Detect Gravitational Waves As Black Holes Collide

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A LIGO optics technician inspects one of LIGO's core optics by illuminating its surface with light. It is critical to LIGO's operation that there is no contamination on any of its optical surfaces. Matt Heintze/Caltech/MIT/LIGO Lab hide caption

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Matt Heintze/Caltech/MIT/LIGO Lab