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California legislators in 2019 passed the law that requires all the state's 33 public university campuses to provide abortion pills. It took effect in January 2023, but LAist found that basic information for students to obtain the medication is often nonexistent. Jackie Fortiér/LAist hide caption

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Jackie Fortiér/LAist

Pro-Palestinian and pro-Israeli supporters converge at a demonstration of New York University students in November. Andrew Lichtenstein/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Lichtenstein/Corbis via Getty Images

'Fear rather than sensitivity': Most U.S. scholars on the Mideast are self-censoring

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Claudine Gay (from left), president of Harvard University, Liz Magill, president of University of Pennsylvania, Pamela Nadell, professor of history and Jewish studies at American University, and Sally Kornbluth, president of Massachusetts Institute of Technology, testify before the House Education and Workforce Committee on Tuesday. Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Dietsch/Getty Images

Lawmakers grill the presidents of Harvard, MIT and Penn over antisemitism on campus

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Columbia University closed campus to the public ahead of pro-Israel and pro-Gaza rallies on Thursday. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

U.S. students are clashing over the Israel-Hamas war. What can colleges do?

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West Virginia's legislature has passed a bill that would allow concealed carry of firearms on public college campuses, including West Virginia University (pictured here). Ray Thompson/AP hide caption

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Ray Thompson/AP

A hazing-related student death at Bowling Green State University has renewed conversations about hazing on college campuses. Adam Lacy/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images hide caption

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Adam Lacy/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images

As Campus Life Resumes, So Does Concern Over Hazing

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University of Illinois graduate student Kristen Muñoz submits her saliva sample for coronavirus testing on the Urbana-Champaign campus. Christine Herman/Illinois Public Media hide caption

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Christine Herman/Illinois Public Media

Today's college students aren't necessarily having more sex than previous generations, but the culture that permeates hookups on campus has changed. Mark Peterson/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Peterson/Corbis via Getty Images

Hookup Culture: The Unspoken Rules Of Sex On College Campuses

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Texas Tech freshman Regan Elder helps drape a bed sheet with the message "No Means No" over the university's seal at the Lubbock, Texas campus in 2014 to protest what students say is a "rape culture" on campus. Betsy Blaney/AP hide caption

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Betsy Blaney/AP

Members of the black student protest group Concerned Student 1950 raise their arms during a rally at Mizzou. Protests like this are making high schoolers look twice at where they want to study and the culture of racism on campus. Jeff Roberson/AP hide caption

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Jeff Roberson/AP

Amid Application Season, Seniors Consider A New Criterion: Race Relations

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