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On Friday, Big Cypress National Preserve announced in a post to Facebook that its team of researchers had discovered a 17-foot python, the largest one ever to be removed from the swamp. Big Cypress National Preserve/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Big Cypress National Preserve/Screenshot by NPR

Flamingos at Jungle Island, a zoological theme park, in Miami in 2017. The long-legged pink birds were once common in Florida. But their striking feathers were prized decorations for ladies' hats, and they were thought to have been hunted out of existence for the plume trade in the 1800s. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Florida's Long-Lost Wild Flamingos Were Hiding In Plain Sight

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Old World climbing fern on a tree island in the Everglades surrounds LeRoy Rodgers of the South Florida Water Management District. Environmentalists say it's one of the worst invasive species the state has faced in a long time. Amy Green/WMFE hide caption

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Amy Green/WMFE

Invasive Fern In Florida Threatens To Take Down More Than Just Trees

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Frank Mazzotti, a professor of wildlife biology and researcher with the Everglades environmental restoration team, has been studying alligators in the national park for more than a decade. Amy Green/WMFE hide caption

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Amy Green/WMFE

Honey, Who Shrank The Alligators?

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This is one of several canals that will be filled to slow the movement of water through the Everglades, restoring an ecosystem environmentalist Marjory Stoneman Douglas called the "river of grass."€ Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Greg Allen/NPR

Once Parched, Florida's Everglades Finds Its Flow Again

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Fish and Wildlife Commissioner Ron Bergeron handles a snake as part of the Python Challenge in the Everglades. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Greg Allen/NPR

Hunting Snakes In The Everglades To Protect Native Species

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A botanist walks through the Pine Flatwoods of Big Cypress Preserve in December 2012. The preserve is home to several oil wells, but a proposed seismic study — being fought by environmentalists — could dramatically increase exploration. Tim Chapman/MCT/Landov hide caption

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Tim Chapman/MCT/Landov

Environmentalists Sound Alarm On Proposed Drilling Near Florida Everglades

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