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Sea levels in Guyana are rising several times faster than the global average. High tides sometimes spill over the seawall that is meant to protect the coastline. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

Two Sides Of Guyana: A Green Champion And An Oil Producer

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A seawall stretches for hundreds of miles along the coast of Guyana, in northern South America. It protects the low-lying coastal lands where the majority of Guyana's population lives. The region is acutely threatened by rising sea levels, as well as other symptoms of climate change, yet Guyana is embracing the oil industry. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Ryan Kellman/NPR

Guyana is a poor country that was a green champion. Then Exxon discovered oil

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A new study has found that home sale prices and volume appear to be declining in Florida coastal areas at vulnerable-to-rising sea levels compared to coastal areas with less risk. Here, the balcony view from a luxury condo in Sunny Isles Beach, Fla., in 2017. Rhona Wise/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Rhona Wise/AFP via Getty Images

Tourists walk across flooded St. Mark's Square two days after Venice suffered its highest tide in 50 years. Filippo Monteforte/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Filippo Monteforte/AFP via Getty Images

The suns sets as an iceberg floats in the Nuup Kangerlua Fjord near Nuuk in southwestern Greenland, where glaciers have been melting. David Goldman/AP hide caption

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David Goldman/AP

The Sea Level Threat To Cities Depends On Where The Ice Melts — Not Just How Fast

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Drivers maneuver through floodwater after a torrential rain in Alexandria, Egypt. Ibrahim Ramadan/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Ibrahim Ramadan/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

In Egypt, A Rising Sea — And Growing Worries About Climate Change's Effects

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Rachelle Ianelli (left) and Austin Jacobs (middle) both archaeological students from University of Florida, together with Florida Public Archaeology Network representative Rachael Kangas, excavate a section at "Garden Patch," a settlement populated after rising seas forced people to leave Bird Island. Neill Wallis/University of Florida hide caption

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Neill Wallis/University of Florida

What Can We Learn From Early Floridians On Sea-Level Rise?

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French Foreign Minister and President of the COP21 Laurent Fabius (center) gives a thumbs up while U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon (left) and French President Francois Hollande applaud after the final meeting of the U.N. conference on climate change in Le Bourget, France, on Saturday. Francois Mori/AP hide caption

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Francois Mori/AP