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A police officer in Montreal guards the front of an apartment building, where Amor Ftouhi lived before traveling to the U.S. earlier this month. Ftouhi, a Canadian resident, is suspected of stabbing an airport police officer in Flint, Mich., on Wednesday. The FBI said it is investigating it as an "act of terrorism." Julien Besset/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Julien Besset/AFP/Getty Images

The Flint Water Plant water tower in Flint, Mich. The state has paid more than $40 million in credits for the unsafe water in an effort to ease the burden for residents. Carlos Osorio/AP hide caption

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Carlos Osorio/AP

Jeneyah McDonald looks over homework her oldest son Justice, 6, brought home from school while her youngest son Josiah, 2, drinks Kool-Aid from a bottle at their home in Flint, Mich., in February. Laura McDermott for NPR hide caption

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Laura McDermott for NPR

Despite Tough Year, Flint Mother Stays Strong For Her Children

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Darnell Earley, former emergency manager of Flint, Mich., at a House Oversight and Government Reform Committee hearing in March. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Along Saginaw Street in Flint, Mich. Mark Brush/Michigan Radio hide caption

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Mark Brush/Michigan Radio

Even As Levels Improve, Flint Residents Choose Bottled Water Over Tap

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The state says more than 600 pipes have been replaced in Flint, Mich., this year — but 30,000 suspect pipes remain. Bill Pugliano/Getty Images hide caption

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Bill Pugliano/Getty Images

A Year Later, Unfiltered Flint Tap Water Is Still Unsafe To Drink

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A government watchdog's report says Flint residents' exposure to lead in city drinking water could have been stopped months earlier by federal regulators. Carlos Osorio/AP hide caption

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Carlos Osorio/AP

The interior of the Flint water plant is seen on Sept. 14 in Flint, Mich. The city is still struggling to replace thousands of corroded lead pipes that tainted drinking water. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

In Year Since Water Crisis Began, Flint Struggles In Pipe Replacement Efforts

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The Rev. Faith Green Timmons interrupts Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump as he speaks during a visit to Bethel United Methodist Church in Flint, Mich. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Trump Criticizes Flint Pastor — But Misstates Key Facts About Their Encounter

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Mayor Karen Weaver takes a sip of water at the House Democratic Steering & Policy Committee hearing titled, "The Flint Water Crisis: Lessons for Protecting America's Children." Gabriella Demczuk/Getty Images hide caption

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Gabriella Demczuk/Getty Images

Flint Mayor: 'Everybody Played A Role In This Disaster'

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Katherine Du for NPR

Where Lead Lurks And Why Even Small Amounts Matter

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The Flint River in downtown Flint, Mich. The state's attorney general, Bill Schuette, announced felony and misdemeanor charges Friday against six state employees in connection with the lead-contamination of the city's drinking water Bill Pugliano/Getty Images hide caption

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Bill Pugliano/Getty Images

Pilot tests discovered high levels of lead in three water fountains at this school on Chicago's South Side. The fountains were shut down and replaced with water coolers. Cheryl Corley/NPR hide caption

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Cheryl Corley/NPR

High Lead Levels Discovered In Chicago School's Drinking Fountains

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President Obama drinks a glass of filtered Flint water during a meeting with federal officials at the Food Bank of Eastern Michigan in Flint, Mich., on Wednesday. Daniel Mears/AP hide caption

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Daniel Mears/AP

Lead in the drinking water in Flint, Mich., has caused a massive public health crisis and prompted President Obama to declare a federal state of emergency there. Carlos Osorio/AP hide caption

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Carlos Osorio/AP

Educators In Flint Step Up Efforts To Reach Youngest Victims Of Tainted Water

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