zika zika

Twins Heloisa (left) and Heloa Barbosa, both born with microcephaly, had a one-year birthday party on April 16 in Areia, Brazil. Their mother says she contracted the Zika virus during pregnancy. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

How Zika Became So Dangerous For Babies

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Maria Carolina Silva Flor and Joselito Alves dos Santos with their 18-month-old daughter, Maria Gabriela Silva Alves. The baby was born with Zika syndrome. Amanda Klasing hide caption

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Amanda Klasing

When the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention lifted its last Zika travel advisory for Miami-Dade County last week, residents and visitors to Miami's popular South Beach neighborhood were relieved. Still, doctors say, pregnant women should continue to take extra precautions. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Pregnant women — and those trying to get pregnant — should not travel to places where the Zika virus is circulating. For children, age is a factor. Alessandro Abel/Getty Images/EyeEm hide caption

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Alessandro Abel/Getty Images/EyeEm

Is Zika Dangerous For Kids? It Probably Depends On The Age

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Puerto Rico resident Michelle Flandez caresses her two-month-old son Inti Perez, diagnosed with microcephaly linked to the mosquito-borne Zika virus. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says the Zika virus continues to impact a small number of pregnant women and their babies in the U.S. Carlos Giusti/AP hide caption

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Carlos Giusti/AP

A family member holds twins Eloisa (left) and Eloa, both 8 months old and born with microcephaly, during a Christmas gathering. The mother of the twins, Raquel, who lives in Brazil, said she contracted Zika during her pregnancy. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Yalieth Gonzalez and her baby Micaela Delgado at the Maternal Infant Studies Center at the University of Puerto Rico. Marisa Penaloza/NPR hide caption

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Marisa Penaloza/NPR

Living With Zika In Puerto Rico Means Watching, Waiting And Fearing Judgment

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Andie Vaught grasps a stress toy in the shape of a truck as she prepares to have blood drawn as part of a clinical trial for a Zika vaccine at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Md., in November 2016. Allison Shelley/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Allison Shelley/The Washington Post/Getty Images

From left: A scene from the video of a car crash test; illustration of a mosquito transmitting the Zika virus; a menstrual shed in Nepal. Insurance Institute for Highway Safety/YouTube; BSIP/UIG via Getty Images; Poulomi Basu/Magnum Emergency Fund hide caption

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Insurance Institute for Highway Safety/YouTube; BSIP/UIG via Getty Images; Poulomi Basu/Magnum Emergency Fund

No one is sure why the northeastern part of Brazil has been hit so hard with microcephaly cases. Felipe Dana/AP hide caption

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Felipe Dana/AP

How Dangerous Is Zika For Babies, Really?

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Florida Department of Health workers package a urine test, part of the state's effort to provide free Zika tests to pregnant women. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

A mother holds her baby, who has microcephaly, in Recife, Brazil. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Zika No Longer Global 'Health Emergency,' WHO Declares

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A government worker sprays mosquito insecticide fog in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, earlier this month to block the spread of Zika. The U.S. CDC advises pregnant women to reconsider plans to travel to Malaysia and 10 other countries because of the virus. Joshua Paul/AP hide caption

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Joshua Paul/AP

Pregnant Women Should Consider Not Traveling To Southeast Asia

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