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Courtney Hering, who is getting married next year, is planning a slightly more lavish wedding reception. After seven years at Kohler, she finally feels like she has found a professional home. Sara Stathas for NPR hide caption

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Sara Stathas for NPR

2-Tiered Wages Under Fire: Workers Challenge Unequal Pay For Equal Work

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With the economy humming, U.S. unemployment is at a nearly 50-year low. Shouldn't we be excited? Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

America Is In Full Employment, So Why Aren't We Celebrating?

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Betty Fernandez of Macy's department store speaks with a potential applicant about job openings during a job fair in Miami on April 5. Employers added far more jobs than expected in April — another sign the U.S. economy is chugging along as the expansion nears the 10-year mark. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Unemployment Drops To 3.6%, 263,000 Jobs Added, Showing Economy Remains Strong

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Kim Morrison, (right) co-owner of Beanz & Co. Cafe in Avon, Conn., with her employee, Nick Sinacori, as they serve customers during their opening week. David DesRoches/Connecticut Public Radio hide caption

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David DesRoches/Connecticut Public Radio

A Connecticut Cafe Provides Jobs For Adults With Disabilities

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A worker installs a roof on a home being built in San Diego in 2017. The housing market has been softening, with sales of new single-family homes falling in October to the lowest level in more than 2 1/2 years. Mike Blake/Reuters hide caption

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Mike Blake/Reuters

Job seekers line up at a technology fair in Los Angeles in March. Employers added more jobs than analysts expected last month, as the jobless rate remained at a nearly 50-year low of 3.7 percent. Monica Almeida/Reuters hide caption

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Monica Almeida/Reuters

According to a recent NPR/Marist poll, 30 percent of Americans do something else for pay in addition to their full-time jobs. Ilana Kohn/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Ilana Kohn/Ikon Images/Getty Images

When A Full-Time Job Isn't Enough To Make It

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Images from Mike Tannenbaum; Lindsay Hodgson; Brenden Gunnell

Voices Of America's Contract Workers: 'I Love The Freedom'

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John Vensel is a contract attorney at the Orrick law firm in Wheeling, W.Va. He says contract work is today's economic reality. Yuki Noguchi/NPR hide caption

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Yuki Noguchi/NPR

Freelanced: The Rise Of The Contract Workforce

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Economists use the phrase "full employment" to mean the number of people seeking jobs is roughly in balance with the number of openings. heshphoto/Getty Images/Image Source hide caption

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heshphoto/Getty Images/Image Source

Why Some Still Can't Find Jobs As The Economy Nears 'Full Employment'

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