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Julie Eldred is back at home in Massachusetts now. But she was sentenced to a treatment program for opioid addiction as part of a probation agreement, then sent to jail when she relapsed. Some addiction specialists say that's unjust. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

Court To Rule On Whether Relapse By An Addicted Opioid User Should Be A Crime

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Opana ER, a potent extended-release opioid, was approved by the FDA for pain management in 2006. But the agency says Endo's attempts to reformulate the pills to make them harder to crush, dissolve and inject have not been successful. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

Sen. Charles Grassley, R-Iowa (left), and Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., are drafting legislation that would call for new penalties for selling synthetic opioids. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Lawmakers Consider Tough New Penalties For Opioid Crimes, Bucking Trend

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Michael Botticelli, former director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy, testifies during a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on attacking America's epidemic of heroin and prescription drug abuse. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Former Drug Czar Says GOP Health Bill Would Cut Access To Addiction Treatment

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Seth Herald for NPR

A Peer Recovery Coach Walks The Front Lines Of America's Opioid Epidemic

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Jasmine Pacheco and her mother, Carmen Pacheco-Jones, on their recent visit with StoryCorps in Spokane, Wash. StoryCorps hide caption

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StoryCorps

Out Of The 'Wreckage Of The Past,' A Family Salvaged By Love

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Nicole Xu for NPR

A Small Town Struggles With A Boom In Sober Living Homes

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Taylor Callery/Ikon Images/Getty Images

'Unbroken Brain' Explains Why 'Tough' Treatment Doesn't Help Drug Addicts

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Like many small towns, Bridgton, Maine, had few resources for people seeking treatment for opioid abuse. Susan Sharon/MPBN hide caption

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Susan Sharon/MPBN

A Small Town Bands Together To Provide Opioid Addiction Treatment

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The FDA is is expected to decide by May 27 whether a long-acting, implantable version of this anti-addiction drug, buprinorphine, will be available in the United States. The implant is more convenient, proponents say, and less likely to be abused. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

FDA Considering Pricey Implant As Treatment For Opioid Addiction

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Carolyn Rossi, a registered nurse at the Hospital of Central Connecticut, says the opioid epidemic has required nurses who used to specialize in care for infants gain insights into caring for addicted mothers, as well. Rusty Kimball/Courtesy of Hartford HealthCare hide caption

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Rusty Kimball/Courtesy of Hartford HealthCare

To Help Newborns Dependent On Opioids, Hospitals Rethink Mom's Role

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Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton (left) hugs Annette Bebout, 73, of Newton, during a campaign event at Berg Middle School, in Newton, Iowa, this week. Bebout told her story to the audience of how she lost her home. Paul Sancya/AP hide caption

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Paul Sancya/AP

Clinton Runs As Wonk In Chief, Trying To Win Hearts With Plans

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