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A view inside Rhode Island's John J. Moran Medium Security Prison, in Cranston. Rhode Island is the only state to screen every individual who comes into the correctional system for opioid use disorder, and to offer, in conjunction with with counseling, all three medically effective treatments. Andrew Burton/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Burton/Getty Images

Rhode Island Prisons Push To Get Inmates The Best Treatment For Opioid Addiction

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Melania Trump talks with a patient at the Monroe Carell Jr. Children's Hospital in Nashville, Tenn., on Tuesday. The first lady was promoting her Be Best campaign to help children. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Katiena Johnson stands with her daughter Destini, who was released from jail in August. Katiena and her husband, Roger, took care of their grandchildren while Destini was struggling through her addiction. Destini, 27, recently regained consciousness after suffering a dozen or so strokes as a result of her latest opioid overdose. Seth Herald for NPR hide caption

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Seth Herald for NPR

Anguished Families Shoulder The Biggest Burdens Of Opioid Addiction

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Images of the music superstar at Prince's Paisley Park Museum in Chanhassen, Minn. His death has been ruled accidental by the local medical examiner. Adam Bettcher/Getty Images hide caption

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Adam Bettcher/Getty Images

On Wednesday Walmart began distributing a new solution to help customers dispose of leftover opioid prescriptions. But CDC says, just flush them down the toilet. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Could Prescription Heroin And Safe Injection Sites Slow The Opioid Crisis?

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Andy Baker/Ikon Images/Getty Images

Telemedicine For Addiction Treatment? Picture Remains Fuzzy

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Marlene Shay's (right) son Adam overdosed on heroin when he was 21 years old. His kidney and pancreas went to Karen Goodwin, a recovering addict herself. Jud Esty-Kendall/StoryCorps hide caption

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Jud Esty-Kendall/StoryCorps

After He Died From An Opioid Overdose, She Got A New Chance At Life

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President Trump has an opportunity to refocus on the military with a Medal of Honor ceremony and to congressional priorities as he heads to Capitol Hill Tuesday. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

Nate Miller is the owner of Express Employment Professionals, a staffing agency in Muncie, Ind., that screens and places workers at local manufacturing companies. Yuki Noguchi/NPR hide caption

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Yuki Noguchi/NPR

Opioid Crisis Looms Over Job Market, Worrying Employers And Economists

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A vaccine against heroin wouldn't be like the measles vaccine that you receive once for a lifetime of immunity, say scientists working on it. Multiple shots per year would likely be required, and it would be specific to just heroin and morphine. kimberrywood/Getty Images hide caption

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A 'Vaccine For Addiction' Is No Simple Fix

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Vivian Shih for NPR

Kids Struggling With Addiction Need School, Too, But There Are Few Options

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Maria Fabrizio for NPR

Without Medical Support, DIY Detox Often Fails

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A 1980 letter published in the New England Journal of Medicine was later widely cited as evidence that long-term use of opioid painkillers such as oxycodone was safe, even though the letter did not back up that claim. Education Images/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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Education Images/UIG via Getty Images

Doctor Who Wrote 1980 Letter On Painkillers Regrets That It Fed The Opioid Crisis

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Kim Ryu for NPR

A Drugmaker Tries To Cash In On The Opioid Epidemic, One State Law At A Time

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Opana ER, a potent extended-release opioid, was approved by the FDA for pain management in 2006. But the agency says Endo's attempts to reformulate the pills to make them harder to crush, dissolve and inject have not been successful. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

Sen. Charles Grassley, R-Iowa (left), and Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., are drafting legislation that would call for new penalties for selling synthetic opioids. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Lawmakers Consider Tough New Penalties For Opioid Crimes, Bucking Trend

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