opioid abuse opioid abuse

Could Prescription Heroin And Safe Injection Sites Slow The Opioid Crisis?

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President Trump has an opportunity to refocus on the military with a Medal of Honor ceremony and to congressional priorities as he heads to Capitol Hill Tuesday. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

Nate Miller is the owner of Express Employment Professionals, a staffing agency in Muncie, Ind., that screens and places workers at local manufacturing companies. Yuki Noguchi/NPR hide caption

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Yuki Noguchi/NPR

Opioid Crisis Looms Over Job Market, Worrying Employers And Economists

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A vaccine against heroin wouldn't be like the measles vaccine that you receive once for a lifetime of immunity, say scientists working on it. Multiple shots per year would likely be required, and it would be specific to just heroin and morphine. kimberrywood/Getty Images hide caption

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kimberrywood/Getty Images

A 'Vaccine For Addiction' Is No Simple Fix

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Vivian Shih for NPR

Kids Struggling With Addiction Need School, Too, But There Are Few Options

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Maria Fabrizio for NPR

Without Medical Support, DIY Detox Often Fails

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A 1980 letter published in the New England Journal of Medicine was later widely cited as evidence that long-term use of opioid painkillers such as oxycodone was safe, even though the letter did not back up that claim. Education Images/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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Education Images/UIG via Getty Images

Doctor Who Wrote 1980 Letter On Painkillers Regrets That It Fed The Opioid Crisis

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Kim Ryu for NPR

A Drugmaker Tries To Cash In On The Opioid Epidemic, One State Law At A Time

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Opana ER, a potent extended-release opioid, was approved by the FDA for pain management in 2006. But the agency says Endo's attempts to reformulate the pills to make them harder to crush, dissolve and inject have not been successful. Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

Sen. Charles Grassley, R-Iowa (left), and Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., are drafting legislation that would call for new penalties for selling synthetic opioids. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Lawmakers Consider Tough New Penalties For Opioid Crimes, Bucking Trend

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Hannah Berkowitz in her parents' home in West Hartford, Conn. Getting intensive in-home drug treatment is what ultimately helped her get back on track, she and her mom agree. Jack Rodolico/NHPR hide caption

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Jack Rodolico/NHPR

Home-Based Drug Treatment Program Costs Less And Works

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Allyson and Eddie, clients at the AAC Needle Exchange and Overdose Prevention Program in Cambridge, Mass., say they carry naloxone and try to never use drugs alone to reduce the risk of overdosing. Robin Lubbock for WBUR hide caption

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Robin Lubbock for WBUR

Fentanyl Adds A New Terror For People Abusing Opioids

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Christopher Milford in his apartment in East Boston, Mass. He quit abusing opioids after getting endocarditis three times. Jack Rodolico/NHPR hide caption

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Jack Rodolico/NHPR

Doctors Consider Ethics Of Costly Heart Surgery For People Addicted To Opioids

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A pair of studies show declines in opioid use by young people, including prescription use, intentional misuse and accidental poisonings. Gabe Souza/Portland Press Herald/Getty Images hide caption

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Gabe Souza/Portland Press Herald/Getty Images

Michael Botticelli, former director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy, testifies during a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on attacking America's epidemic of heroin and prescription drug abuse. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Former Drug Czar Says GOP Health Bill Would Cut Access To Addiction Treatment

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German dictator Adolf Hitler gives a speech in October 1944. Author Norman Ohler says that Hitler's abuse of drugs increased "significantly" from the fall of 1941 until the winter of 1944. Keystone/Getty Images hide caption

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Keystone/Getty Images

Author Says Hitler Was 'Blitzed' On Cocaine And Opiates During The War

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Maria Fabrizio for NPR

A Medicine That Blunts The Buzz Of Alcohol Can Help Drinkers Cut Back

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Dr. Joel Funari performs some 300 tooth extractions annually at his private practice in Devon, Pa.. He's part of a group of dentists reassessing opioid prescribing guidelines in the state. Elana Gordon / WHYY hide caption

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Elana Gordon / WHYY

Dentists Work To Ease Patients' Pain With Fewer Opioids

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A doctor at a Boston Medical Center clinic counsels a patient who has become addicted to opioid painkillers, and wants help kicking the habit. Addiction specialists say drugs like suboxone, which mitigates withdrawal symptoms, can greatly improve his odds of success. Suzanne Kreiter/Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Suzanne Kreiter/Boston Globe via Getty Images