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Leading our news round up, is a new study. It finds that toothed whales can make a range of vocalizations, including some akin to human 'vocal fry,' thanks to a special nasal structure. NOAA NMFS hide caption

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NOAA NMFS

A new study finds that toothed whales can make a range of vocalizations, including some akin to human 'vocal fry,' thanks to a special nasal structure. Adam Li / NOAA/NMFS/SWFSC hide caption

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Adam Li / NOAA/NMFS/SWFSC

Toothed whales use 'vocal fry' to hunt for food, scientists say

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A chimp walks at Chimp Haven in Louisiana. A federal judge has ruled that the NIH violated the law when it chose not to move former research chimpanzees in New Mexico to the sanctuary. Gerald Herbert/AP hide caption

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Gerald Herbert/AP

Pancake (front) and Huey arrived at Chimp Haven from an NIH facility earlier this year. Chimp Haven hide caption

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Chimp Haven

Two chimpanzees roam the grounds of Chimp Haven in Louisiana. Many former research chimpanzees have been sent to retire at the sanctuary. Images provided by Chimp Haven hide caption

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Images provided by Chimp Haven

The NIH is 'largely finished' moving its former research chimps to a sanctuary

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A scientist is pictured working during a visit by Britain's Prince William, Duke of Cambridge (unseen), to Oxford Vaccine Group's laboratory facility at the Churchill Hospital in Oxford, west of London on June 24, 2020, on his visit to learn more about the group's work to establish a viable vaccine against coronavirus COVID-19. STEVE PARSONS/POOL/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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STEVE PARSONS/POOL/AFP via Getty Images

Ketamine appears to restore faulty connections between brain cells, according to research performed in mice. Kevin Link/Science Source hide caption

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Kevin Link/Science Source

Ketamine May Relieve Depression By Repairing Damaged Brain Circuits

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Since early 2013, 110 chimpanzees have been retired to Chimp Haven sanctuary in Keithville, La., from the New Iberia Research Center in Lafayette, La. That's the largest group of government-owned chimps ever sent to sanctuary. Sabrina, seen here, arrived at Chimp Haven in 2013. Brandon Wade/AP Images for The Humane Society hide caption

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Brandon Wade/AP Images for The Humane Society

Researchers found that a protein in human umbilical cord blood plasma improved learning and memory in older mice, but there's no indication it would work in people. Mike Kemp/Rubberball/Getty Images hide caption

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Mike Kemp/Rubberball/Getty Images

Human Umbilical Cord Blood Helps Aging Mice Remember, Study Finds

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Sam Rowe for NPR

Drugs That Work In Mice Often Fail When Tried In People

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Rats are great at remembering where they last sniffed the strawberries. Alexey Krasaven/Flickr hide caption

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Alexey Krasaven/Flickr

Rats That Reminisce May Lead To Better Tests For Alzheimer's Drugs

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One of the frigatebirds that researchers tagged soared 40 miles over the Indian Ocean without a wing-flap. These birds were photographed in the Galapagos. Lucy Rickards/Flickr hide caption

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Lucy Rickards/Flickr

Nonstop Flight: How The Frigatebird Can Soar For Weeks Without Stopping

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Diane, a 4-year-old chimpanzee, relaxes in the trees at the Chimp Haven sanctuary in Keithville, La., on Aug. 25, 2014. She is one of many chimps who have been moved here from the New Iberia Research Center in Lafayette, La. Brandon Wade/AP hide caption

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Brandon Wade/AP