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Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg testifies before a joint hearing of the U.S. Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee and Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., on Tuesday. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

This week, Facebook began notifying people whether they had ever logged in to the "This Is Your Digital Life" app — which has been linked to the exposure of tens of millions of records for political research. NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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NurPhoto via Getty Images

According to reporting by CNBC, Cubeyou collected data from Facebook users through personality quizzes "for non-profit academic research" developed with Cambridge University, and then sold the data to advertisers. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Richard Drew/AP

Facebook Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg speaks during the 2018 MAKERS Conference on Feb. 6 in Los Angeles. Vivien Killilea/Getty Images for MAKERS hide caption

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Vivien Killilea/Getty Images for MAKERS

Companies such as Playboy and Space X have deleted their official Facebook pages amid the Cambridge Analytica scandal. The social media giant is losing more than just profiles: Its market value has decreased by $80 billion. Chandan Khanna/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Chandan Khanna/AFP/Getty Images

Mary Guedon of the group Raging Grannies holds a sign as she protests in 2010 outside of the Facebook headquarters in California. Privacy advocates say it's too difficult to fully protect your privacy on Facebook. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Is It Even Possible To Protect Your Privacy On Facebook?

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A Country Divided, Click By Click

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Officers from the Information Commissioner's Office enter the offices of Cambridge Analytica in central London. The investigators had a search warrant as part of what has been reported to be a broader investigation into possible ties between Cambridge Analytica and the campaign for the U.K. Brexit referendum. Yui Mok/AP hide caption

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Yui Mok/AP

Presidential candidate and front-runner Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador delivers a speech during a rally in Guadalajara on Feb. 11. On Wednesday, he said of Cambridge Analytica: "Now that it's a worldwide scandal, people are finally paying attention." ULISES RUIZ/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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ULISES RUIZ/AFP/Getty Images

In Mexico, Candidates Move Away From Cambridge Analytica

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Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg walks at the company's headquarters in Menlo Park, Calif., in 2013. NPR asked Americans what steps they take to protect their Facebook data. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

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Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

Some of Cambridge Analytica's claims about its role in Donald Trump's 2016 campaign suggest it may have violated U.S. campaign finance laws. Chris J. Ratcliffe/Getty Images hide caption

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Chris J. Ratcliffe/Getty Images

Cambridge Analytica Chief Executive Alexander Nix leaves the company's offices in central London on Tuesday. He was suspended amid a controversy about the company's use of social media data. Dominic Lipinski/AP hide caption

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Dominic Lipinski/AP

Alexander Nix, the currently suspended CEO of Cambridge Analytica, speaks at a 2016 event in New York City. Nix and his firm are accused of misusing the personal data of 50 million people as part of their political consulting work, which included President Trump's 2016 campaign. Bryan Bedder/Getty Images for Concordia Summit hide caption

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Bryan Bedder/Getty Images for Concordia Summit

What Did Cambridge Analytica Do During The 2016 Election?

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Cambridge Analytica CEO Alexander Nix is heard on the secret recordings saying that one strategy for compromising opponents is to "send some girls around to the candidate's house." Patricia De Melo Moreira/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Patricia De Melo Moreira/AFP/Getty Images

Facebook: Firm Working With Trump Campaign Stole 50 Million Users' Data

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Facebook suspended Cambridge Analytica, a data-analysis firm that worked for President Trump's 2016 campaign, over allegations that it held onto improperly obtained user data after telling Facebook it had deleted the information. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP

Facebook Suspends Political Data Firm Used In Trump Campaign

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