self driving self driving
Stories About

self driving

Cruise rolled out hundreds of its robotaxis in San Francisco this year. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Driverless car startup Cruise's no good, terrible year

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1222083720/1222507068" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Fire officials said the Tesla driver was killed and a passenger was critically injured Saturday when the car plowed into the firetruck parked on a Northern California freeway. Contra Costa County Fire Protection District via AP hide caption

toggle caption
Contra Costa County Fire Protection District via AP

A Waymo minivan moves along a city street during an autonomous vehicle ride on April 7 in Chandler, Ariz. Waymo, a unit of Google parent Alphabet Inc., is one of several companies testing driverless vehicles in the U.S. Automakers are also developing self-driving technology, but it still requires human drivers to take over when required. Ross D. Franklin/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Ross D. Franklin/AP

Cars are getting better at driving themselves, but you still can't sit back and nap

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1064598337/1068430222" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Two years after Uber paid $680 million to buy the self-driving truck startup Otto, the company is folding that effort. In this photo from 2016, an Otto engineer sits behind the steering wheel of a self-driving, big-rig truck during a demonstration in San Francisco. Tony Avelar/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Tony Avelar/AP

Starsky Robotics is retrofitting large trucks to make them driverless. The startup hopes that by the end of the year, it will be able to operate a truck without a person physically sitting in the vehicle. Courtesy of Starsky Robotics hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Starsky Robotics

Google announced it is partnering with Fiat Chrysler Automobiles to expand its self-driving car project. This is the first time Google has worked directly with an automaker to integrate its self-driving technology into a passenger vehicle. FCA US LLC hide caption

toggle caption
FCA US LLC

While other automakers are working on a gradual progression toward more automation in cars, Google has its eyes on a fully automated self-driving car. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Bloomberg via Getty Images

Google Makes The Case For A Hands-Off Approach To Self-Driving Cars

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/467983440/467988136" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Google was told by the National Highway Traffic Administration earlier this month that the self-driving car system can be considered as a driver. San Jose Mercury News/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
San Jose Mercury News/TNS via Getty Images

What's Next For Self-Driving Cars?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/467724324/467733019" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">