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Central American migrants, hoping to ask for asylum in the United States, are being relocated to a temporary shelter in Tijuana, Mexico. Volunteers from San Diego visit the migrants weekly to help with health care. GUILLERMO ARIAS/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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GUILLERMO ARIAS/AFP/Getty Images

For Asylum-Seekers Waiting In Mexico, Volunteers Offer Medical Help

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Secretary of State Mike Pompeo tells NPR that the U.S. remains committed to the Kurds, American allies in the Syrian war, even as the U.S. plans to withdraw troops from the country. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Despite Remaining ISIS Threats, Pompeo Says U.S. Made 'Caliphate In Syria Go Away'

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Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen looks at her papers while testifying before members of the House Judiciary Committee on Thursday in Washington, D.C. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

People line up to cross into the United States from Tijuana, Mexico, seen through barriers topped with concertina wire at the San Ysidro Port of Entry in San Diego. A federal judge on Wednesday blocked the administration from enforcing a ban on asylum-seekers fleeing gang violence or domestic abuse. Gregory Bull/AP hide caption

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Gregory Bull/AP

When thousands of Hondurans and other Central Americans poured into Tijuana, Aguilar knew he had to do something. "They're from the same streets and cities as us. They're family!" he says. "It wasn't up for discussion, it was simply a matter of going out there and getting these people fed with a taste of home." Tomás Ayuso for NPR hide caption

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Tomás Ayuso for NPR

A refugee transit center on Manus Island, Papua New Guinea, in a photo taken last year. Two class action lawsuits are seeking injunctions to transfer refugees held there to Australia and award damages to them. Aziz Abdul/AP hide caption

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Aziz Abdul/AP

Migrants walk to the U.S.-Mexico border in Tijuana, Mexico, last week to make requests for political asylum. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

Trump Administration Faces 2 Legal Challenges For Asylum Restrictions

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People line up to cross into the United States to begin the process of applying for asylum near the San Ysidro Port of Entry in Tijuana, Mexico. President Trump has threatened to close the border to asylum-seekers. Gregory Bull/AP hide caption

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Gregory Bull/AP

FACT CHECK: Migrants Are Not Overwhelming The Southwest Border

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A migrant who scaled a border fence from Morocco into the Spanish enclave of Melilla shows their injured hands, in March 2014. Spain is seeing a record of largely sub-Saharan African migrants and asylum-seekers making risky journeys to enter the country. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

In May, Attorney General Jeff Sessions ordered a "zero tolerance" policy aimed at people entering the United States illegally for the first time on the Mexican border. Over 1,000 immigrant detainees were housed in five federal prisons across the West. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

A 12-year-old Iranian refugee girl, who had tried to set herself on fire with petrol, rests in a bed in Nauru, where nearly 1,000 refugees and asylum seekers have been sent by the government of Australia. Mike Leyral/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mike Leyral/AFP/Getty Images

Nicaraguan refugees fleeing their country due to unrest sleep in a Christian church in San José, Costa Rica, on July 28. Juan Carlos Ulate/Reuters hide caption

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Juan Carlos Ulate/Reuters

200 Nicaraguans Claim Asylum Daily In Costa Rica, Fleeing Violent Unrest

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A police officer walks through a gate at the Tompa border station transit zone in April 2017. Hungary has two "transit zones" with shipping containers that are used to automatically detain migrants while their asylum claims are investigated. This month, Hungary began denying food to asylum-seekers whose claims were rejected and appealed, human rights groups say. Attila Kisbenedek/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Attila Kisbenedek/AFP/Getty Images

In this July 17 photo provided by Aziz Abdul, a man standing on a balcony at the East Lorengau Refugee Transit Center on Manus Island, Papua New Guinea. The question of what will become of the hundreds of asylum-seekers banished by Australia to sweltering immigration camps in the poor Pacific island nations of Papua New Guinea and Nauru has become more pressing. Aziz Abdul via AP hide caption

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Aziz Abdul via AP

An Asylum-Seeker Wrote A Book By Phone Texts From Manus Island Detention

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Sisters from Guatemala seeking asylum, cross a bridge to a port of entry in to the United States from Matamoros, Mexico, in Brownsville, Texas. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

Denied Asylum, But Terrified To Return Home

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The E. Barrett Prettyman U.S. Courthouse in Washington, D.C., where a federal judge ruled against the Trump administration's detention of asylum-seekers. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Federal Judge Orders Administration To End Arbitrary Detention Of Asylum-Seekers

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