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U.S. Attorney General William Barr decided on Tuesday that asylum-seekers who clear a "credible fear" interview and are facing removal don't have the right to be released on bond by an immigration court judge while their cases are pending. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Juan Carlos Perla of El Salvador kisses his 10-month-old son, Joshua, inside a migrant shelter in Tijuana, Mexico, where they await their asylum hearing in San Diego. Gregory Bull/AP hide caption

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Gregory Bull/AP

Good Neighbor Settlement House in Brownsville, Texas, is helping recently released migrants by offering them a meal, shower and some new clothes before journeying up north to await their day in immigration court. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

Shelters And City Governments Scramble To Help Migrants In The Rio Grande Valley

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Migrants trudge along the border fence to a waiting bus after turning themselves in to the Border Patrol at the U.S.-Mexico border near El Paso, Texas. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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John Burnett/NPR

A Surge Of Migrants Strains Border Patrol As El Paso Becomes Latest Hot Spot

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Rahaf Mohammed Alqunun, 18, addresses the media during a news conference at a refugee resettling agency in Toronto on Jan. 15. She pledged to "work in support of freedom for women around the world, the same freedom I experienced on the first day I arrived in Canada." Cole Burston/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Cole Burston/AFP/Getty Images

Saudi Kingdom Tries To Prevent More Women From Fleeing

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In late January, Carlos Catarldo Gomez of Honduras was the first person returned to Mexico to wait for his asylum trial date. The Trump administration announced on Tuesday that this program, dubbed 'Migrant Protection Protocols,' will expand from San Diego to Calexico, Calif. Gregory Bull/AP hide caption

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Gregory Bull/AP

A performer who goes by Beatrix Lestrange organized and hosted the No Border Wall Protest Drag Show in Brownsville, Texas. Reynaldo Leanos Jr./Texas Public Radio hide caption

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Reynaldo Leanos Jr./Texas Public Radio

A young man and a little girl look at the border fence from Playas de Tijuana, Mexico. Photojournalist Ariana Drehsler has been covering the caravan of migrants for weeks. In December, Customs and Border Protection agents began pulling her over for questioning each time she crossed back into the U.S. Ariana Drehsler for NPR hide caption

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Ariana Drehsler for NPR

Behrouz Boochani, a Kurdish-Iranian journalist and asylum-seeker, won two prestigious Australian literary prizes for his debut, a book composed in text messages sent from a detention center on Manus Island. Hoda Afshar hide caption

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Hoda Afshar

Carlos Catarldo Gomez, of Honduras, center, is escorted by Mexican officials after leaving the United States, the first person returned to Mexico to wait for his asylum trial date, in Tijuana, Mexico Gregory Bull/AP hide caption

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Gregory Bull/AP

Karen Paz hugs her daughter, Liliana Saray, 9. They are from San Pedro Sula, Honduras. "I feel free; I feel different," Paz said. "I don't have someone who imposes his views and his ways on me. I am not scared someone will come and attack me, like I used to be." Federica Valabrega hide caption

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Federica Valabrega

Lawyer Patricia Ortiz meets with Rosa, an immigrant from El Salvador, at the Esperanza Immigrant Rights Project offices in Los Angeles to discuss her asylum case. David Wagner/KPCC hide caption

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David Wagner/KPCC

Asylum-Seekers In California Wait For Their Day In Immigration Court

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