coal industry coal industry

Robert Murray of Murray Energy (right) meets with Energy Secretary Rick Perry at the Department of Energy headquarters in Washington in a March 29, 2017, photo obtained by The Associated Press. Simon Edelman/AP hide caption

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Simon Edelman/AP

A work crew for the Pittsburgh company Energy Independent Solutions installs solar panels at a community building in Millvale, Pa. Reid Frazier/The Allegheny Front hide caption

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Reid Frazier/The Allegheny Front

As Coal Jobs Decline, Solar Sector Shines

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Kevin Butt, Toyota's regional environmental sustainability director, at a facility that uses methane to generate clean electricity to help run Toyota's auto plant in central Kentucky. Jennifer Ludden/NPR hide caption

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Jennifer Ludden/NPR

Big Business Pushes Coal-Friendly Kentucky To Embrace Renewables

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Johnstown, Pa., nestled in the Allegheny mountains, has more registered Democrats than Republicans, but has voted Republican in the last two presidential elections. Acacia Squires/NPR hide caption

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Acacia Squires/NPR

How's The New President Doing? Voters In One Trump County Talk

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Jamie Ruppert and her husband Jesse Ruppert live in White Haven, Pa. Jamie voted for Barack Obama twice but switched parties and voted for Republican Donald Trump this election. She hopes Trump will bring more good-paying blue-collar jobs to communities like hers. Jeff Brady/NPR hide caption

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Jeff Brady/NPR

A Trump Swing Voter Looks Ahead

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President-elect Donald Trump's promises to bring back miner jobs and open mines appealed to many voters in coal country. Dominick Reuter/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Dominick Reuter/AFP/Getty Images

Former coal miners are trained as linesmen in a program co-sponsored by the Hazard Community and Technical College and the Eastern Kentucky Concentrated Employment Program in Hazard, Ky. EKCEP Inc. hide caption

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EKCEP Inc.

Eastern Kentucky Tries To Keep Former Coal Miners From Leaving

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In 2006, a bulldozer sits ready for work at Peabody Energy's Gateway Coal Mine near Coulterville, Ill. Peabody is the latest coal company to declare bankruptcy. Seth Perlman/AP hide caption

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Seth Perlman/AP

March 25: Bankruptcies Fuel Uncertainty In Coal Communities

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Reclaimed land that was once mined for coal in Wyoming's Powder River Basin. When coal companies declare bankruptcy, funding for land reclamation becomes a question Leigh Paterson/Inside Energy hide caption

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Leigh Paterson/Inside Energy

When Coal Companies Fail, Who Pays For The Cleanup?

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