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Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha, who helped expose the Flint water crisis, speaks during a House Democratic Steering and Policy Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., on Feb. 10, 2016. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

State and federal policies now limit the use of lead in gasoline, paint and plumbing, but children can still ingest the metal through contaminated soil. The effects of even fairly small amounts can be long-lasting, the evidence suggests. Christin Lola/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

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Christin Lola/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Childhood Exposure To Lead Can Blunt IQ For Decades, Study Suggests

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Lead in the drinking water in Flint, Mich., has caused a massive public health crisis and prompted President Obama to declare a federal state of emergency there. Carlos Osorio/AP hide caption

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Carlos Osorio/AP

Educators In Flint Step Up Efforts To Reach Youngest Victims Of Tainted Water

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Chicago's North Broadway Street has been undergoing water main upgrades in the past few weeks, with more work scheduled this year. The upgrades are part of the city's 10-year plan to replace 900 miles of water pipes. Cheryl Corley/NPR hide caption

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Cheryl Corley/NPR

Chicago's Upgrades To Aging Water Lines May Disturb Lead Pipes

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A Madison Water Utility Crew works to dig up and replace a broken water shutoff box in preparation for a larger pipe-lining project. Madison started using copper instead of lead pipes in the late 1920s. Cheryl Corley/NPR hide caption

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Cheryl Corley/NPR

Avoiding A Future Crisis, Madison Removed Lead Water Pipes 15 Years Ago

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Third-graders Ezekiel White (right) and Emanuel Black push a jug of water to the cafeteria at Southwest Baltimore Charter School. Jennifer Ludden/NPR hide caption

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Jennifer Ludden/NPR

Before Flint, Lead-Contaminated Water Plagued Schools Across U.S.

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