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Kanesha Adams stands in the parking lot outside of Jim Clyburn's World-Famous Fish Fry on June 21 in Columbia, S.C. The event featured appearances by 21 Democratic presidential candidates seeking voters in the early primary state. Sean Rayford for NPR hide caption

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Sean Rayford for NPR

Clarisa Corber at work at a Topeka, Kan., insurance agency. Corber and her husband — who have three kids, a health plan and $15,000 in medical debt — were profiled in a recent Los Angeles Times investigation into the effects of high-deductible health plans. Nick Krug/Los Angeles Times hide caption

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Nick Krug/Los Angeles Times

Employees Start To Feel The Squeeze Of High-Deductible Health Plans

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Author Ta-Nehisi Coates says of Trump voters: "I think if you say, 'Well yeah, Donald Trump ran a racist campaign, but I voted for him despite that,' that is to say that having somebody who runs that type of campaign is not a disqualifier to you." Paul Marotta/Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Marotta/Getty Images

'His Ideology Is White Supremacy': Ta-Nehisi Coates On Donald Trump

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Federal housing policies created after the Depression ensured that African-Americans and other people of color were left out of the new suburban communities — and pushed instead into urban housing projects, such as Detroit's Brewster-Douglass towers. Paul Sancya/AP hide caption

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Paul Sancya/AP

A 'Forgotten History' Of How The U.S. Government Segregated America

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Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., won re-election as House minority leader on Wednesday with support from just over two-thirds of her caucus. Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call,Inc. hide caption

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Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call,Inc.

The 'Dangerous, Volatile Game' Trump Plays With The White Working Class

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Hillary Clinton arrives to sign her book "Hards Choices" at a bookstore on Martha's Vineyard on August 13, 2014. According to the Clintons' 2015 tax returns, the couple earned $3.1 million from book advances and royalties. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

Graduates arrive at the start of their commencement ceremony on the campus of Liberty University in Lynchburg, Va., in 2015. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

The Latest Clinton Converts? White, College-Educated Voters

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Audience members hold up signs supporting Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump during a campaign rally in Boca Raton, Fla., on Sunday. Paul Sancya/AP hide caption

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Paul Sancya/AP