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radicalization

An officer stands at the Fresnes Prison in France in September 2016. Fresnes was the first French prison to separate radicalized inmates from the general prison population. Patrick Kovarik/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick Kovarik/AFP/Getty Images

Inside French Prisons, A Struggle To Combat Radicalization

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Dounia Bouzar, shown here in 2015, helps parents in France who want to prevent their kids from joining militant groups like ISIS — whose recruiters, she says, "set out to break every emotional, social and historical tie in the kids' lives." Charles Platiau/Reuters hide caption

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Charles Platiau/Reuters

Defusing The Lure Of Militant Islam In France, Despite Death Threats

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Mourad Benchellali speaks to a group of students and parents in Strasbourg, France. In 2001 Benchellali traveled to Afghanistan to visit his brother, and was forced into an al-Qaida training camp. He now speaks out against radical Islam. Courtesy of Mourad Benchellali hide caption

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Courtesy of Mourad Benchellali

A French Community Tries To Get A Handle On Radicalization

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Mohammed Ashfaq is the managing director of Kikit Pathways, a nonprofit that works with the British government's Prevent program to stop radicalization. A ribbon-cutting in Birmingham inaugurated a double-decker bus designed to allow Kikit to go into communities and help people who are addicted to drugs and considered at risk of radicalization. Frank Langfitt / NPR hide caption

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Frank Langfitt / NPR

U.K.'s Anti-Radicalization Program Cites Successes, But Also Draws Fire

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Supporters of Egypt's ousted President Mohammed Morsi, a Muslim Brotherhood leader, chant slogans against the Egyptian military during a trial in which they were charged with violence in Alexandria, Egypt, on March 29, 2014. Thousands of Muslim Brotherhood supporters have been jailed by the current government. A former prisoner tells NPR he saw some turn to ISIS in prison. Heba Khamis/AP hide caption

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Heba Khamis/AP

As Egypt's Jails Fill, Growing Fears Of A Rise In Radicalization

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Allan Aarslev, a police superintendent in Aarhus, became part of the effort to make young Muslims feel like they have a future in Denmark. Scanpix Denmark/USAScanpix/Sipa hide caption

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Scanpix Denmark/USAScanpix/Sipa

Authorities say Omar Mateen killed dozens of people inside the Pulse nightclub in Orlando, Fla., on Sunday. AP hide caption

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AP

Investigators Say Orlando Shooter Showed Few Warning Signs Of Radicalization

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The Psychology Of Modern Terrorism: What Drives Radicalization At Home

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Playwright Ismaël Saïdi speaks to a mostly-Muslim students at a school in the Brussels district of Laeken, where two suicide-bombers grew up. Teri Schultz for NPR hide caption

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Teri Schultz for NPR

In Tough Brussels District, School Urges Students To Fight Intolerance

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