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Bret Adee, a third-generation beekeeper who owns one of the largest beekeeping companies in the U.S., lost half of his hives — about 50,000 — over the winter. He pops the lid on one of the hives to show off the colony inside. Greta Mart/KCBX hide caption

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Greta Mart/KCBX

Massive Loss Of Thousands Of Hives Afflicts Orchard Growers And Beekeepers

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A stingless Mayan bee (Melipona beecheii) gorges itself with honey during the harvest in Yucatan, Mexico. Eric Tou/Visuals Unlimited via Getty Images hide caption

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Eric Tou/Visuals Unlimited via Getty Images

Beehives in an apiary Daniel Milchev/Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Milchev/Getty Images

Beekeepers Feel The Sting Of California's Great Hive Heist

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Beekeepers inspect bee frames at the Hudson Gardens community apiary near Littleton, Colo. Modeled after community gardens, community apiaries allow beekeepers to maintain hives in public spaces — and offer each tips and support. Courtesy of Hudson Gardens hide caption

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Courtesy of Hudson Gardens

A beehive at Frangiosa Farms, in Parker, Colo. The farm introduced an adopt-a-hive program in 2012. The one-time adoption fees per hive range from $45 to $130 (the latter gets you three jars of honey). Courtesy of Nick French/Frangiosa Farms hide caption

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Courtesy of Nick French/Frangiosa Farms