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Coal ash swirls on the surface of the Dan River following one of the worst coal-ash spills in U.S. history into the river in Danville, Va., in February 2014. The Environmental Protection Agency wants to ease restrictions on coal ash and wastewater from coal plants. Gerry Broome/AP hide caption

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Gerry Broome/AP

An e-bike resembles a regular bicycle, with its batteries and electric motor integrated into the bike's frame. Enthusiasts see e-bikes on national park trails as a great thing, but some traditional riders and environmentalists see big problems ahead. Mark Arehart/WKSU hide caption

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Mark Arehart/WKSU

National Parks Trying To Get A Handle On E-Bikes

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A 30-foot border barrier — as tall as a two-story building — rises from the desert near Lukeville, Ariz. Laiken Jordahl /Center for Biological Diversity hide caption

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Laiken Jordahl /Center for Biological Diversity

Border Wall Rising In Arizona, Raises Concerns Among Conservationists, Native Tribes

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Environmental Protection Agency administrator Andrew Wheeler speaks during a television interview in front of the West Wing of the White House, on Sept. 19, 2019. Wheeler has threatened to withdraw billions of dollars in federal highway money unless California clears a backlog of air pollution control plans. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

The wake of a supply vessel heading toward a working platform crosses over an oil sheen drifting from the site of the former Taylor Energy oil rig in the Gulf of Mexico in 2015. The Coast Guard says it has contained the oil spill. Gerald Herbert/AP hide caption

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Gerald Herbert/AP

In coal country, restoring streams like this one near Logan, W.Va., is a big business. But the practice remains controversial among some scientists. Courtesy of Canaan Valley Institute hide caption

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Courtesy of Canaan Valley Institute

Green tips of of a newly developed grain called Salish Blue are poking through older, dead stalks in Washington's Skagit Valley. Eilís O'Neill/KUOW/EarthFix hide caption

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Eilís O'Neill/KUOW/EarthFix

A man crosses a bridge over the Poudre River, in Fort Collins, Colo. The picturesque river is the latest prize in the West's water wars, where wilderness advocates usually line up against urban and industrial development. Brennan Linsley/AP hide caption

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Brennan Linsley/AP

A view of the beach known as "La Selva," part of the Northeast Ecological Corridor reserve, in Luquillo, Puerto Rico. Andres Leighton/AP hide caption

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Andres Leighton/AP

Grass-Roots Fight To Protect Puerto Rico's Coast Scores Environmental Prize

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The village of Hoosick Falls, N.Y., sits along the Hoosick River in eastern New York. Elevated levels of a suspected carcinogen known as PFOA were found in the village's well water, which is now filtered. Hansi Lo Wang/NPR hide caption

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Hansi Lo Wang/NPR

Elevated Levels Of Suspected Carcinogen Found In States' Drinking Water

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