Panama Papers Panama Papers

Journalist Explains How Panama Papers Opened Up The World's Illicit Money Networks

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A Reporter On The Panama Papers: The Basic Idea Is 'To Hide True Ownership'

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Panama's economy, expected to grow by 6 percent this year, is a bright spot in Latin America. Many Panamanians believe their country has been unfairly tarnished by the Panama Papers revelations. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Panama Papers Fallout Hurts A Reputation Panama Thought It Had Fixed

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A police officer stands outside the Mossack Fonseca law firm Tuesday as organized crime prosecutors raid the offices in Panama City. Arnulfo Franco/AP hide caption

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Arnulfo Franco/AP

Want To Set Up A Shell Corporation To Hide Your Millions? No Problem

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The Panama Papers may help settle an ownership claim over Amedeo Modigliani's Seated Man With a Cane, which Philippe Maestracci says was seized from his grandfather by the Nazis. Christie's Images/Corbis hide caption

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Christie's Images/Corbis

Panama Papers Provide Rare Glimpse Inside Famously Opaque Art Market

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Panama Is More Than A Hashtag

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A pedestrian walks past the building housing the offices of Mossack Fonseca in Panama City, Panama, on Tuesday. The massive trove of emails, contracts and other papers from the law firm is being called the largest document leak in history. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg via Getty Images

Progress Made To Rein In Shell Corporations, But More Action Needed

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Police stand watch Tuesday as protesters gather outside the Parliament building in Reykjavik, Iceland. The prime minister resigned after he was named in the Panama Papers as having set up secret offshore accounts through a shell company that was seeking money from failed Icelandic banks that received government bailout funds. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Icelandic Prime Minister Sigmundur David Gunnlaugsson attends a session of Parliament in the country's capital city, Reykjavik, on Monday. Halldor Kolbeins/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Halldor Kolbeins/AFP/Getty Images

Iceland Finds Itself In The Middle Of Panama Papers Leak

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Iceland Finds Itself In The Middle Of Panama Papers Leak

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People in Reykjavik gather Monday to demonstrate against Sigmundur David Gunnlaugsson, Iceland's prime minister. Gunnlaugsson insisted he would not resign after leaked documents allegedly linked him to an offshore company that could represent a serious conflict of interest. Brynjar Gunnarsson/AP hide caption

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Brynjar Gunnarsson/AP

Panama Papers Shed Light On Global Business Of Tax Avoidance

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Cellist, conductor — and alleged billionaire — Sergei Roldugin (left) with Vladimir Putin at Russia's St. Petersburg Music House in 2009. Mikhail Svetlov/Getty Images hide caption

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Mikhail Svetlov/Getty Images