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Cassandra Thomas of Human Rights Campaign holds a sign advocating the repeal of HB2 on Dec. 7, 2016, in Charlotte. Brian Gomsak/AP Images for Human Rights Campaign hide caption

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Brian Gomsak/AP Images for Human Rights Campaign

Supporters of Democratic Gov.-elect Roy Cooper and those advocating to repeal HB2 hold signs last month in Charlotte, N.C. Brian Gomsak/AP Images for Human Rights Campaign hide caption

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Brian Gomsak/AP Images for Human Rights Campaign

Greensboro Coliseum, seen here during last year's ACC tournament, won't be hosting early rounds of the NCAA basketball tournament — the games will be played in South Carolina, instead. Grant Halverson/Getty Images hide caption

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Grant Halverson/Getty Images

The ACC is choosing new locations for neutral-site championships because of North Carolina's controversial law known as HB2. Here, Clemson fans tailgate outside Bank of America Stadium in Charlotte, prior to last December's NCAA Atlantic Coast Conference championship college football game. Gerry Broome/AP hide caption

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Gerry Broome/AP

An official and others wait for play to resume between the Butler Bulldogs and the Virginia Cavaliers during a second-round NCAA men's tournament game in March in Raleigh, N.C. This coming spring, the road to the Final Four won't go through North Carolina, as the NCAA has decided to move three games out of Greensboro. Grant Halverson/Getty Images hide caption

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Grant Halverson/Getty Images

An official and others wait for play to resume during an NCAA Men's Basketball Tournament second-round game between the Butler Bulldogs and the Virginia Cavaliers in March in Raleigh, N.C. This coming spring the Road to the Final Four won't go through North Carolina, as the NCAA has decided to move three games out of Greensboro. Grant Halverson/Getty Images hide caption

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Grant Halverson/Getty Images

The NBA is relocating the 2017 All-Star Game from Charlotte, N.C., because of a state law that limits civil rights protections for LGBT people. Bruce Yeung/Getty Images hide caption

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Bruce Yeung/Getty Images

Supporters of House Bill 2 gather for a rally at the North Carolina State Capitol in Raleigh, N.C., on April 11. A recent poll found that nearly 49 percent of North Carolinians support at least some part of the controversial law. Gerry Broome/AP hide caption

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Gerry Broome/AP

North Carolinians Who Support 'Bathroom Law' Say They're Being Drowned Out

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A bathroom sign welcomes both genders at the Cacao Cinnamon coffee shop in Durham, N.C., on May 3. Jonathan Drake/Reuters hide caption

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Jonathan Drake/Reuters

When A Transgender Person Uses A Public Bathroom, Who Is At Risk?

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In an interview with NPR's Robert Seigel, North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory defended the controversial HB2 law. Gerry Broome/AP hide caption

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Gerry Broome/AP

N.C. Gov. McCrory Claims 'Political Left' Fed Emergence Of Transgender Issues

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Demonstrators against House Bill 2 protest outside the Governor's Mansion in downtown Raleigh, N.C., on March 24. Among other restrictions, the law says transgender people have to use the bathroom that corresponds with their biological sex rather than their gender identity. Jill Knight/Raleigh News & Observer/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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Jill Knight/Raleigh News & Observer/TNS via Getty Images

Brewers in North Carolina are planning to donate all of the profits from a new beer to two groups that work on behalf of the LGBT community. Raleigh News & Observer/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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Raleigh News & Observer/TNS via Getty Images

"To my mind, it's an attempt by people who cannot stand the progress our country has made in recognizing the human rights of all of our citizens to overturn that progress," said Bruce Springsteen, canceling a planned April 10 concert in North Carolina. Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP hide caption

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Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP