brown university brown university
Stories About

brown university

Pulse oximeters are known to be biased against darker skin tones. Kimani Toussaint is a physicist at Brown University working on an alternative to the pulse oximeter. Joshua Burrow/Kimani Toussaint hide caption

toggle caption
Joshua Burrow/Kimani Toussaint

COVID-19 made pulse oximeters ubiquitous. Engineers are fixing their racial bias

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1156166554/1200393049" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Olivia Pichardo, 18, has been named to Brown University's baseball team. She's the first woman named to the roster of a Division I baseball team in the U.S. Brown University Athletics hide caption

toggle caption
Brown University Athletics

A pulse oximeter is worn by Brown University professor Kimani Toussaint. The devices have been shown in research to produce inaccurate results in dark-skinned people, and Toussaint's lab is developing technology that would be more accurate, regardless of skin tone. Craig LeMoult hide caption

toggle caption
Craig LeMoult

When it comes to darker skin, pulse oximeters fall short

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1110370384/1110904587" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A boa constrictor feeds on a lizard in Tijuca Forest National Park, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Vitor Marigo / Aurora Photos/Getty Images/Aurora Open hide caption

toggle caption
Vitor Marigo / Aurora Photos/Getty Images/Aurora Open

This trick keeps snakes from suffocating as they squeeze and swallow their prey

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1088192843/1088879172" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

At Shiru Cafe in Providence, R.I., students "pay" for coffee, but not with money. Chaiel Schaffel/Rhode Island Public Radio hide caption

toggle caption
Chaiel Schaffel/Rhode Island Public Radio

Siblings Sangeeta (from left), Sunil and Ravi Tripathi. Sunil went missing weeks before the Boston Marathon, and media outlets misidentified him as one of the bombing suspects. One Production Place hide caption

toggle caption
One Production Place

How Social Media Smeared A Missing Student As A Terrorism Suspect

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/474671097/474696616" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">