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Three TikTok phenomena of 2022: the pop star Bad Bunny; an Inuit mother and daughter who teach how to say yes with your eyebrows; and one of the Iranians who cut their hair in solidarity with 22-year-old Mahsa Amini, who died in custody after being detained by Iran's morality police for allegedly wearing her hijab inappropriately. tiktok.com/Screenshots by NPR hide caption

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tiktok.com/Screenshots by NPR

A man wears a mask as the territory of Nunavut enters a two week mandatory restriction period in Iqaluit, Nunavut, Canada, on Wednesday. More than 80 COVID-19 cases have been identified this month in Nunavut, where around 39,000 people, predominantly Inuit, live in communities scattered across the territory. Natalie Maerzluft/Reuters hide caption

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Natalie Maerzluft/Reuters

Photo highlights from our top stories: Inuit parenting teaches kids how to control anger; a fisherman holds up a fish caught in Lake Malawi, where transactional sex is part of the fish trade; the Dandora Landfill in Nairobi, Kenya. Johan Hallberg-Campbell for NPR; Julia Gunther; Edward Burtynsky, courtesy Robert Koch Gallery, San Francisco / Nicholas Metivier Gallery, Toronto hide caption

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Johan Hallberg-Campbell for NPR; Julia Gunther; Edward Burtynsky, courtesy Robert Koch Gallery, San Francisco / Nicholas Metivier Gallery, Toronto

Orto Ignatiussen outside his home in Tasiilaq, Greenland, in 2016. Rebecca Hersher/NPR hide caption

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Rebecca Hersher/NPR

An Inuit Actor Contemplates A Big Break Gone Small

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A resident of the town formerly known as Barrow, Alaska, rides her motorcycle along an Arctic Ocean beach in 2005. The town is now officially called Utqiagvik, its Inupiaq name. Al Grillo/AP hide caption

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Al Grillo/AP

How To Pronounce Utqiagvik

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Der ligger en lille ø midt i den gamle havn i Kangeq. John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

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John W. Poole/NPR

Lyt til Anda Poulsen og Nuuk Trommedansere.

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Ice-bound fishing boats in the harbor at Tiniteqilaaq, Greenland. Only about 50 people live in what was once a great hunting community. Rebecca Hersher/NPR hide caption

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Rebecca Hersher/NPR

Inside The Suicide Epidemic At The Top Of The World

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Greenland native Nina-Vivi Andersen, pictured in downtown Nuuk, Greenland, has her own perspective on the word Eskimo: "I don't mind to be called Eskimo — it is neutral for me. But when I saw an ice cream store in London with a name — Eskimo — it felt weird. But I feel weird to be called Inuit, too. I'm just a Greenlander." John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

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John W. Poole/NPR

A small island sits in the middle of Kangeq's old harbor. John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

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John W. Poole/NPR

The Arctic Suicides: It's Not The Dark That Kills You

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