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Luminalt solar installers Pam Quan (right) and Walter Morales (left) install solar panels on a roof in San Francisco on Wednesday. The California Energy Commission approved a regulation that would require all new homes in the state to have solar panels. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

A rooftop is covered with solar panels at the Brooklyn Navy Yard in New York last February. The Trump administration is considering whether to impose tariffs on imports of solar materials. Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

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Mark Lennihan/AP

Solar cells sit in the sun at the Desert Sunlight Solar Farm in Desert Center, Calif. The people who run California's electric grid expect the solar power output to be cut roughly in half during the eclipse. Marcus Yam/LA Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Marcus Yam/LA Times via Getty Images

California Prepares For An Eclipse Of Its Solar Power

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A work crew for the Pittsburgh company Energy Independent Solutions installs solar panels at a community building in Millvale, Pa. Reid Frazier/The Allegheny Front hide caption

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Reid Frazier/The Allegheny Front

As Coal Jobs Decline, Solar Sector Shines

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K.K. DuVivier stands by a smart meter that sends electricity back to her utility, Xcel Energy. The Denver home gets credits from Xcel for power that's added back to the grid. Grace Hood/Colorado Public Radio hide caption

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Grace Hood/Colorado Public Radio

As Rooftop Solar Challenges Utilities, One Aims For A Compromise

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Kevin Butt, Toyota's regional environmental sustainability director, at a facility that uses methane to generate clean electricity to help run Toyota's auto plant in central Kentucky. Jennifer Ludden/NPR hide caption

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Jennifer Ludden/NPR

Big Business Pushes Coal-Friendly Kentucky To Embrace Renewables

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Judith Ausah (left) and Evelyn Sewodey create solar panels at the Lady Volta Vocational Center for Electricity and Solar Power in Ghana. "At first, I thought it was man's work," says Ausah, whose 2-month-old daughter stays in the school nursery. "But I came here and saw that, yes, women can do it." Ginanne Brownell/For NPR hide caption

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Ginanne Brownell/For NPR

On some sunny, spring days, California has more electricity than it can use, like from this solar farm in Fresno. Terry O'Rourke/NREL hide caption

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Terry O'Rourke/NREL

Who's In Charge? Getting Western States To Agree On Sharing Renewable Energy

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