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Patrick Meier (center, in cap) flies a drone in Nepal after the earthquake in 2015. Meier and his team were able to to capture detailed images of damage around the capital, Kathmandu. He believes using this technology will make crisis mapping even more effective for disaster response. Courtesy of Patrick Meier/WeRobotics hide caption

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Courtesy of Patrick Meier/WeRobotics

When Disaster Strikes, He Creates A 'Crisis Map' That Helps Save Lives

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Sir Harold W. Kroto, a winner of the 1996 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, gave a lecture on nanoarchitecture in May 2007, in Brussels. "Find something to do where only your best effort will satisfy you," he advised students. Sebastien Pirlet/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Sebastien Pirlet/AFP/Getty Images

Listen: Sir Harry Kroto Was More Than A Nobel Prize Winner

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"I never imagined I would be in this position, doing this kind of work," says Raed Al Saleh, 33, of his job as the head of the Syrian Civil Defense. "But these are the circumstances." Courtesy of The Syria Campaign hide caption

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Courtesy of The Syria Campaign